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E3 Update:

Astilleros-built VLCC Incorporates Technical Innovation Of Basic E3—And Then Some The E3 VLCC under construction at Astilleros Espanoles for Naviera Tapias incorporates all of the technical advantages found in the original basic E3 design, as well as some additional features. Under construction at Astilleros' Puerto Real Yard, the $100 million vessel (contract price at ordering time; around $86 million at press time) measures 1,099 feet (335 m) long overall, with a 187-foot (57 m) width, a 103.3-foot (31.5 m) depth, and a 72.8-foot (22.2 m) draft. The 295,300-dwt vessel is scheduled for delivery in June of 1995. The E3 project (which stands for Ecological, Economical and European) was hatched by five leading European shipyards— Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG (HDW); Bremer Vulkan AG; Chantiers de l'Atlantique; Fincantieri; and Astilleros Espanoles—in order to build a vessel which complied with the latest IMO requirements as well as OPA '90 requirements. The basic E3 design includes many advanced features to meet the project's lofty ecological and economical goals, including: • The width of the double hull has been increased above IMO requirements, in order to minimize the risk of leakage in the case of collision or grounding, • A tank arrangement with 24 cargo tanks plus two slop tanks, an arrangement agreed upon following studies into the the behavior of tank arrangement in the case of accidents. The advantage of the chosen arrangement includes noto low-oil outflow in the event of damage, flexibility in respect of parcel loading and no restrictions for partial tank fillings, • To enhance the vessel's economy, there were extensive model basin tests and computer calculations performed to optimize the ship's hull lines. Also, wake equalization ducts with fins and a vane wheel are provided in order to reduce the engine power required, and to save fuel oil. The E3 project is, however, very flexible, a fact proven by the current vessel being built in the Puerto Real Yard, which includes and offers many more technological advances. The main differences with the advanced E3 are that the design incorporates (as options): • underwater obstacle detection sonar, • hydraulic submerged cargo pumps in each tank, and omission of cargo pump room, • take-home drive geared to main propeller shaft or thrusters for emergency propulsion, • continuous availability of light fuel system for take-home drive, and • portable hatch mounted telescopic device for internal inspection of cargo tanks.

ECOLOGY For the reduction of accidental spills in the event of collision or grounding, the E3's double bottom height measures 9.8 feet (3 m), which is 50 percent above IMO requirements; and has extra wide double sides measuring 13.1 feet (4 m), which is 100 percent above IMO requirements. The ship also has an optimized number and location of longitudinal and transverse bulkheads for maximum reduction of oil spills, and side reinforcement with horizontal stringers inside double side tanks to achieve high-level collision class notation. Finally, the fuel oil tanks are fully protected, separated by a cofferdam from the ship's side.

ECONOMY To effectively increase the service life of the vessel, the amount of high tensile steel totals no more than 30 percent, and the vessel is designed optimally to resist fatigue. Additionally, most of the surfaces are free of structures, and the tank cleaning arrangement is designed for minimum shadow during crude oil washing. For more information on the E3 tanker project, Circle 4 on Reader Service Card

 
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