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Harvey Danforth Goulder

HARVEY DANFORTH GOULDER

IN the practice of admiralty law and the advocacy of the rights of those having charge of the important interests in transportation on the Great Lakes, the name of Harvey Dan- forth Goulder stands preeminent. He is a native of Cleveland, born March 7, 1853, the son of Christopher B. and Barbara (Freeland) Goulder. He was educated in the Cleveland public schools and the Cleveland High School, from which he was graduated in the Class of 1869. Before he left High School he began sailing in the summer season, and it was doubtless this maritime experience which later, when he became a student and practitioner in the legal profession, caused him to turn his attention to admiralty jurisprudence, in which, with insurance and cor-poration practice, he has long been the recognized leader, not only at the Cuyahoga Bar but also in all the commonwealths that border on the Great Lakes.

He devoted his attention to the study of law from the time of leaving the High School, and he was admitted to the Bar and began the practice of law in 1875, at Cleveland. He devoted himself with special zeal to the study of maritime law, and especially to the application of that branch of the law to the interests and activities of lake carriers. It came about, in a few years, that he was engaged upon one side or the other of about every marine case in the courts, State and Federal, at Cleveland, and many elsewhere. His ability in that respect met such recognition that the Vessel Owners' Association, formed for the defense of rights and for the procurement of legislation favorable to the lake transportation business, chose him for their legal guide and adviser, and he became general counsel of the Cleveland Vessel Owners' Association and later of the Lake Carriers Association and the Great Lakes Protective Association. In addition to being the legal adviser of the organized lake carrier bodies he '5 also connected as officer and counsel with various lake navigation companies, and is general counsel for the American Bureau of Shipping.

He has been actively identified with much im-portant litigation and with presenting the claims i-.d representing the interests of lake transportation before boards, commissions and committees. He has been especially prominent in successful efforts in opposition to various Detroit River bridge projects which would be a very severe interference with the navigation of the lakes; active with measures concerning the locks and safeguarding of the land at Sault Sainte Marie, Mich. also the serious questions concerning the lake levels and the effect upon them of the operation of the Chicago Drainage Canal. He has also been very active in the work of the Waterways Congress and in that of the Merchant Marine League. It has been his good fortune to lend an influential voice toward the securing *of improvement of channels and removal of obstruction to navigation on the Great Lakes and their tributaries; and to aid most effectively in promoting the welfare of those engaged in commerce on these great inland waterways.

He has been instrumental in securing for the transportation interests of the Great Lakes many laws and decisions defining their rights and many regulations adding to the safety of navigation, and has at all times been the advocate of every measure that could add to the improvement of lake business.

In insurance litigation, also, he has had many cases of importance, and as counsel for corpora-tions has represented many large interests in liti-gation and has also rendered valuable service as counsel in connection with many important nego-tiations.

Mr. Goulder is a member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers; is one of the vice-presidents of the Maritime Law Association of the United States; is a member of the executive committee of the American Bar Association, a Fellow of the American Geographical Society, the National Geographic Society, the Navy League and various other organizations of a professional character.

He is a member of the Union Club, Country Club, Rowfant Club and Yacht Club, of Cleveland; the India House and the Ohio Society of New York; the Transportation and Ellicott Clubs of Buffalo, and also of the Detroit and Fellow- craft Clubs of Detroit.

 
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