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OCEAN INSTITUTE

Scientists Produce Data from Largest Single Volcano

Project carried out by Schmidt Ocean Institute

  Tamu Massif is a volcano the size of New Mexico and lurks 6,500 feet beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean. During their 36 day expedition, the science team undertook a survey of immense proportions mapping an area nearly one million square kilometers in size. Not only were they able to gather new high-resolution acoustic imagery of this little known volcano, but they also collected 1.7 million magnetic measurements to better understand how such a large volcano was formed. The rocks of the giant volcano record the Earth’s magnetic field at the time they were erupted, giving scientists clues about the timing and process of eruption. The science team aboard R/V Falkor led by University of Houston marine geophysicist Dr. William Sager, were able to gather an immense amount of data, and already have some very interesting findings. Dr. Sager thinks that they may have found another mountain on the west end of the volcano that could have formed at the same time as Tamu Massif. “One thing that stands out about this survey is its sheer size. It was an ambitious cruise to cover all of Tamu Massif, the world’s largest known single volcano”, said Sager. “In all, we spent about 477 hours collecting data over the volcano, which will allow us to produce the best bathymetry map ever of Tamu Massif.”


'Seasteading' Movement Third Conference

Founder-chairman Patri Friedman Addresses: Photo credit Seasteading Institute

The recent Seasteading Institute conference united those who aspire to live in experimental communities founded in permanent ocean habitations The Seasteading Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to enabling the establishment of permanent communities on the ocean, recently held its third conference, at San Francisco’s Le Méridien Hotel. Since 2008, The Seasteading Institute has been the focal point of the seasteading movement


FAU Gets Funds to Help Create Base at Sea

Florida Atlantic University is helping the U.S. military move to the next level, according to a report on www.bocaratonnews.com. The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has provided $2 million to the university to design and build a sea base – a large platform to be used as a jumping-off point for the operations of a Navy unit. FAU’s SeaTech – Institute for Ocean and Systems Engineering in Dania Beach – received a $2 million grant from ONR to investigate, design and build a prototype.


UDEI Hosts Wind Energy Symposium

Cristina Archer: Photo credit UD

Experts explore future of wind energy research in two-day symposium at the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI). How would wind turbines in the ocean alter the wind flow? Is wind energy a practical solution for powering electrical grids? Forward-looking questions such as those were addressed by experts in the field of wind energy at a recent symposium sponsored by the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI)


IRS on Talent Acquisition Spree

   IRClass, the Leading Ship Classification Society has hired 17 of the brightest and best Naval Architecture students from the elite technical institutes of India.   IRClass celebrates its 40th Anniversary this year. In keeping with the philosophy of acquiring the brightest talent, IRClass has visited four technical institutes of India namely, IIT-Chennai, IIT-Kharagpur, Indian Maritime Institute-Vizag and CUSAT-Kochin for campus placements to induct best talent from the


Energy from the Ocean: The Ocean Thermal Energy Converter

A 1MW plant developed by the Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering (KRISO) which will be built for installation off the coast of South Tarawa, Republic of Kiribati, in the South Pacific Ocean.

Despite historic lows in traditional oil and gas energy markets, research and develoment continues in earnest on a number of projects designed to produce green energy. The latest, an Ocean Thermal Energy Converter (OTEC) from KRISO, received Approval in Principle from classification society Bureau Veritas.  KRISO (Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean engineering), established in 1973, is a government-funded research institute in the Republic of Korea and the leader in technology


Piracy Fight Becoming a Private Battle

Map Courtesy of Lowry Institute

New report reveals boom in private military security forces fighting Indian Ocean pirates. Research into the use of private military security companies in the Indian Ocean has found the fight against Somali-based pirates has become a private battle as global defence cuts reduce naval counter-piracy deployments. The report, 'Pirates and Privateers: Managing the Indian Ocean's Private Security Boom'  sheds new light on the serious problem of Somali piracy and highlights new problems


Jensen Hires Jianjun Qi

Jianjun Qi

Jensen Maritime Consultants hired its third naval architect, Jianjun Qi, in the company’s new office in the New Orleans business district, reporting to Jensen General Manager Sergio Fifi. Qi brings to Jensen a decade of naval architecture, marine engineering and shipyard expertise.  Before joining Jensen he worked as a naval architect at Incat Crowther, of Morgan City, La., a diversified naval architecture group


Oceans '13 MTS/IEEE San Diego Preview

Oceans 13 web.jpg

Heeding the call to join “An Ocean in Common,” authors flooded the Oceans ‘13 MTS/IEEE San Diego technical program committee with a record number of abstracts in a single day. Special topics include an Ultra-deep track discussing current and prospective robotic technologies, plus a panel of scientists to consider research questions. Oceans2013 Chair Bob Wernli, and Co-Chair Kevin Hardy, developer of the unmanned landers for James Cameron’s DeepSea Challenge Expedition


Cruise Ship Data to Assist Ocean Scientists

Celebrity Equinox (photo courtesy Celebrity Cruises)

Celebrity Equinox becomes third Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. vessel to feature technology that helps scientists understand effects of climate change Last week, as Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Equinox completed its scheduled drydock in Cadiz, Spain, it joined Royal Caribbean International’s Allure of the Seas and Explorer of the Seas in a program that tracks ocean circulation dynamics and measures atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, on repeated journeys.


Ice algae: The Engine of Life in the Central Arctic Ocean

Algae. Pic: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

 Algae that live in and under the sea ice play a much greater role for the Arctic food web than previously assumed.    In a new study, biologists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) showed that not only animals that live directly


Ocean Signal, AMI Marine Partner

Photo: Ocean Signal

Communication and safety at sea specialist Ocean Signal and manufacturer of marine electronic equipment AMI Marine have formed a new partnership to collaborate on product development for the large commercial vessel sector. Combining the specialist knowledge and extensive technical background of


More Chinese Ships to Use Arctic Route

Photo:  LaRouche PAC

 China will send more ships flying its flag to take the Northwest Passage via the Arctic Ocean to cut travel times between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, says the state news agency Xinhua.   The world's largest maritime carrier China COSCO Shipping Corporation will send more cargo


IMO Workshop in Morocco Promotes Energy Efficiency Measures

Photo: International Maritime Organization

 An International Maritime Organization (IMO) workshop is raising awareness of the organization’s regulatory regime dealing with improving energy efficiency and the control of GHG emissions from ships.    Participants from Moroccan governmental departments


Ocean Cleanup Prototype Set for a Test Run

Union Bear (Photo: Boskalis)

The first ocean cleanup system ever tested at sea will soon be deployed for trials 23 kilometers (12 NM) off the Dutch coast. The goal of the test is to see how the floating barrier design is able to cope in extreme weather at sea during a 12-month period.


World's First Offshore Fish Farm Rig

(Image: Rolls-Royce)

World's First Offshore Fish Farm Rig: Designed by Global Maritime - Owned by SalMar - Built by Qingdao Wuchuan Heavy Industries - Moored by Rolls-Royce   Rolls-Royce signed a contract for the construction and delivery of an eight point mooring system to the world’s first offshore fish


Admiral of the Ocean Sea Award Recipients Named

Clockwise (from top left) Arthur E. Imperatore, Christopher Wiernicki, and Donald Marcus, Photo USS

The United Seamen's Service (USS) 2016 Admiral of the Ocean Sea Awards (AOTOS) will be presented to Arthur E. Imperatore, Founder and President of New York Waterways; Donald Marcus, President of the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots; and Christopher Wiernicki


Freightgate Announces SOLAS VGM Compliance Solution

Image: Freightgate Inc

 Freightgate Inc announced an easy to use, integrated (SSO enabled) solution for International Shippers around the world to comply with the new IMO Requirement to certify VGM (Verified Gross Mass).    The new solution includes a plug-in that let’s you connect directly from


Charting the Shift of Oceanic Boundary Currents

The ocean get heat from the tropical regions and release them to the mid-latitudes, especially over the routes of the subtropical western boundary currents. In a warming climate, the subtropical western boundary currents (except the Gulf Stream) are going to be stronger and shifting toward the poles. They will bring more heat and contribute to a much warmer climate over the adjacent regions (e.g.., Japan, China). (Foto Frank Rödel)

Global warming results in fundamental changes to important ocean currents. As scientists from the Alfred-Wegener-Institute show in a new study, wind-driven subtropical boundary currents in the northern and southern hemisphere are not only going to increase in strength by the end of this century


Advanced MacGregor Technology for Polar Research Ship

The new polar research vessel will be equipped with MacGregor offshore cranes and Triplex systems specifically designed for handling research equipment in extreme temperature environments. Photo MacGregor

MacGregor, part of Cargotec, has won an order to supply MacGregor offshore cranes and a Triplex handling system for a 14,300gt polar research vessel being built for the Polar Research Institute of China. Designed by Aker Arctic Finland, it will be the first vessel of its type to be built in China;


MacGregor to Equip China’s New Polar Research Ship

The new polar research vessel will be equipped with MacGregor offshore cranes and Triplex systems specifically designed for handling research equipment in extreme temperature environments (Image: MacGregor)

The Polar Research Institute of China has ordered a new 14,300gt polar research vessel. Designed by Aker Arctic Finland, it will be the first vessel of its type to be built in China, though a shipyard has yet to be named.   The 122.5-meter multifunctional icebreaker will be able to handle


Emission Changing the Smell of the Sea

Image: University of Hull

Chemistry and biological science experts at the University of Hull, say increasing acidification of the world’s oceans has the potential to significantly disrupt the way marine life communicates, with yet unknown consequences for the ecosystem.


OOI Community Workshop: Cabled, Endurance, and Station Papa

Credit OOI Cabled Array program and the Center for Environmental Visualization, University of Washington

The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) infrastructure is operational and ocean scientists can now integrate OOI observations into their research proposals and projects. The UNOLS Ocean Observing Science Committee (OOSC) along with OOI’s Science Oversight Committee (SOC) are organizing a


Breakthrough in Reconstruction of Warm Climate Phases

The Roaring Forties Die Bruellenden Vierziger courtesy Alfred Wegener Institute

Scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have overcome a seeming weakness of global climate models. They had previously not been able to simulate the extreme warm period of the Eocene


USCG Denies DESMI’s BWTS Test Appeal

Photo: DESMI

The U.S. Coast Guard has denied ballast water treatment systems manufacturer DESMI Ocean Guard’s appeal regarding the USCG’s initial decision to reject the use of the MPN test method in type approval testing of ballast water treatment systems.  






 
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