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Russian Sub Rescue Update: Too Little, Too Late?

Indecision from Russia regarding help from foreign nations in aiding efforts to rescue an estimated 118 sailors trapped in a Nuclear submarine lying on the bottom of the Barents Sea evaporated today, as Norway said that divers due to join a British bid to save 118 Russian sailors trapped in a submarine on the bed of the Barents Sea would arrive on Saturday. Meanwhile, Prime Minister Mikhail Kasyanov said on Thursday the situation around the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk was "next to catastrophic", but he hoped chances remained to save its 118 crew, Russian news agencies reported. "During the past night there were no changes for better or worse," Interfax news agency quoted Kasyanov as telling a government meeting. "We want to hope that there are chances to rescue the crew." The navy said the crew of the Kursk submarine, on the bottom of the Arctic Barents sea since the weekend, stopped tapping SOS signals on the hull on Tuesday. The Seaway Eagle, carrying 12-15 divers, was likely to arrive off north Russia at around midday on Saturday, roughly the same time as a separate supply vessel - the orange-painted supply vessel Normand Pioneer -- carrying a British mini-submarine which will be used to try to rescue the crew of the Kursk. "The divers should arrive at about the same time as the British on Saturday," Foreign Ministry spokesman Karsten Klepsvik said. The ministry had initially estimated the divers would arrive on Friday night.


Oil Prices Slip

According to reports, oil prices fell by three per cent Monday, slipping below $59 a barrel as traders looked ahead to U.S. supply data due out Wednesday that is expected to show rising inventories of crude. Doubts about OPEC's ability to implement a 1.2 million barrels a day production cut also weighed on prices. Last week, oil prices surged after the U.S. Energy Department data showed a large decline in crude-oil inventories


This Day in U.S. Naval History - April 6

1776 - Sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and 7 other vessels   1862 - Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union Troops at Battle of Shiloh   1909 - Commander Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole   1917 - U.S. declares war on Germany   1945 - First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa.   1961 - USS Lake Champlain brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of


This Day in Naval History - Aug. 24

From the Navy News Service 1814 - British invasion of Maryland and Washington, D.C.; Washington Navy Yard and ships burned to prevent capture by the British. 1912 - Launching of USS Jupiter (AC 3), first electrically-propelled Navy ship. 1942 - U.S. carrier aircraft begin two-day Battle of Eastern Solomons where a Japanese task force is defeated and one Japanese carrier sunk. Japanese recall expedition to recapture Guadalcanal.


This Day in Naval History – April 6

1776 - Sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and 7 other vessels 1862 - Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union Troops at Battle of Shiloh 1909 - Commander Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole 1917 - U.S. declares war on Germany 1945 - First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 - USS Lake Champlain brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda.


'Little Ships' Sail To Denmark

A fleet of "Little Ships" left the famous white cliffs of Dover behind them and set off across the Channel on Friday to mark the 1940 Dunkirk evacuation of 340,000 Allied soldiers from France. The 58-strong flotilla had been due Thursday, but rough seas forced them to postpone 24 hours. Sixty years ago, a rag-tag British flotilla plucked 340,000 Allied soldiers from certain death or capture at Dunkirk. Dubbed the "great tide of small vessels" by British wartime leader Winston Churchill


This Day in Naval History – Oct. 16

1885 - CAPT Alfred Thayer Mahan, USN, becomes Superintendent of the Naval War College 1891 - Baltimore Incident, Valparaiso, Chile. 1940 - 5th group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases Deal turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 - Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) conduct attacks on Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 - Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Connecticut.


This Day in Naval History – April 2

1781 - Frigate Alliance captures 2 British privateers, Mars and Minerva 1827 - First Naval Hospital construction begun at Portsmouth, VA 1898 - Adoption of U.S. Naval Academy coat of arms 1947 - UN places former Japanese mandated islands under U.S. trusteeship 1951 - First Navy use of jet aircraft as a bomber, launched from a carrier, USS Princeton. 1960 - USS Glacier begins 12 days of relief operations


This Day in Naval History – May 28

1813 - Frigate Essex and prize capture five British whalers 1917 - First underway fueling in U.S. Navy, USS Maumee fuels 6 destroyers in North Atlantic. LCDR Chester W. Nimitz served as Maumee's executive officer and chief engineer. 1957 - 1st of 24 detonations, Operation Plumbbob nuclear test 1980 - 55 women become first women graduates from the U.S. Naval Academy. (Source: Navy News Service)


This Day in Naval History – March 17

1898 - USS Holland, first practical submarine, launched 1942 - United States Naval Forces Europe established to plan joint operations with British 1958 - Navy Vanguard rocket launches 3.25 pound sphere from Cape Canaveral 1959 - USS Skate (SSN-578) surfaces at North Pole (Source: Navy News Service)


US, UK Navies Plan Future Cooperation

Leaders of the U.S. and British navies agreed on a shared vision for closer cooperation Dec. 11, the culmination of a yearlong effort that will build on a long-standing maritime partnership over the next 15 years.   Chief of Naval Operations Adm


Petronas Delays Canadian LNG Project

Petronas, Malaysia's state-owned oil and gas company, delayed giving the final investment go-ahead on Wednesday for its $11 billion liquefied natural gas export terminal in British Columbia, citing high costs and other outstanding issues.


Maritime Guns For Hire Adapt to Changes in Sea Piracy

Somali pirate attacks down by 95 pct since 2011 -Maritime bureau. Cash-strapped maritime security firms are being forced to use fewer costly elite guards and to diversify into other businesses such as cyber security, as a steep decline in Somali pirate attacks and hotter competition erode


British Wheat Heads to US for First Time in over 2 Years

Britain has sold a shipment of feed wheat to a buyer in the United States, marking the first significant volume in two-and-a-half years, two traders said on Monday. Around 25,000 metric tons of British feed wheat is expected to be shipped from the port of Harwich in the coming days


FortisBC Starts Expansion of Tilbury LNG Facility

Expansion of Tilbury LNG Facility

  FortisBC – a subsidiary of Fortis Inc. has officially started construction of its $400 million Tilbury LNG Facility expansion project today. The company is adding 1.1 million gigajoules of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to storage and 34,000 gigajoules per day of liquefaction capacity


Christie & Grey Celebrate 100th Anniversary

Photo: Christie & Grey, Ltd.

U.K.-based Christie & Grey, Ltd., a company in vibration mitigation technology, announced it is celebrating a century of developing vibration and shock isolation solutions for a wide variety of industries. The present company evolved from the British Anti-Vibration & Noise Co Ltd and


Storm Fay Heads for Bermuda

Subtropical Storm Fay formed in the Atlantic Ocean on Friday and was headed in the direction of Bermuda, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. The storm, which had maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour (65 kph), was located 525 miles (845 km) south of Bermuda and was expected to


SENER Opens UK Office

uilding of the SENER premises in Manchester

SENER opened an Engineering and Construction division in Manchester to reinforce its presence in the United Kingdom.   The group already has work sites set up in the UK and it maintains a close 25-year relationship with Rolls Royce through ITP


Christie and Grey Celebrates 100

U.K. based Christie & Grey, Ltd., a leader in vibration mitigation technology is celebrating a century of developing high performance, cost-effective vibration and shock isolation solutions for a wide variety of industries.   The present company evolved from the British Anti-Vibration


Opposition Builds to UK Nuclear Project in EU Executive

Nuclear power plant

  A landmark deal to use British taxpayers' money to build a 16 billion pound ($25.6 billion) nuclear power station has triggered opposition from a quarter of EU policy-makers, who want to overturn approval from the top European regulator, EU sources said.


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26

USS Ranger (CV-4). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 - First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department organization 1918 - USCGC Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German submarine


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 25

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 25 1941 - In first successful U.S. Navy escort of convoys during World War II, Navy escort turn over HX-150 to British escorts at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. All ships reach port safely. 1957 - In project Stratoscope


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 24

USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) is launched September 24, 1960 at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 24 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas


International Seapower Symposium Kicks Off in Newport, R.I.

ISS pre-meeting talk: Photo USN

The 21st edition of the International Seapower Symposium (ISS) began Sept. 16 at the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I., with more than 170 representatives from 113 nations attending.
 Throughout the three-day symposium, naval leaders from around the world will attend presentations and


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 16

USS Grayback (USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 16 1854 - Cdr. David G. Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 - Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 Naval air stations abroad 1922 - Cdr






 
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