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Exxon Valdez

Ex-'Exxon Valdez' Refused Entry by India

Exxon Valdez Aground: Photo credit NOAA US Govt.

In New Delhi the Supreme Court bans the old Exxon Valdez from entry & scrapping until decontaminated The ship, now known as the "Oriental Nicety," entered Indian waters last week and was headed for Gujarat, when the Supreme Court gave its order, according to a news report in 'The Times of India'. The ship was bought recently by the Hong Kong-based subsidiary of an Indian shipbreaking firm and was being taken to the coastal town of Alang, the hub of India's shipbreaking industry, for dismantling. After the court's order, Gujarat maritime authorities and the state's pollution control authorities withdrew the permission they had granted to the company to anchor the ship near the Alang beach. An environmental activist, Gopal Krishna, had filed an application asking the Supreme Court to give directions to the government and the shipping ministry on the purchase of the ship and its entry into Indian waters. The court has issued notices to the government and the ministry asking for information on steps it intends to take regarding the ship. The Gujarat company contracted to dismantle the ship plans to appeal the court order. "We will abide with the Supreme Court order. We are studying the order, and will appeal," said Harshadbhai Padia, a partner in the company. On March 24, 1989, millions of gallons of crude oil spewed into Alaska's ecologically sensitive Prince William Sound when the Exxon Valdez grounded

Chalos Joins K&L Gates New York Office

Michael G. Chalos has joined the New York office of global law firm K&L Gates LLP as a partner in the maritime practice. Previously the senior partner at the firm of Chalos O’Connor, LLP, Chalos is accompanied in his move by associates Luke Reid and George Kontakis in the firm’s Boston and New York offices, respectively. With a focus on traditional maritime and criminal environmental law, Chalos represents clients involved in high-profile civil and criminal environmental

Smith Appointed VP at Senesco Marine

On July 28, 2003, Smith was hired as Vice President of Sales Engineering for Senesco Marine and will work out of the New Orleans office. Smith joins Senesco Marine with over 25 years experience in engineering, estimating, sales and construction of tank barges. Smith leaves his former position at Halter Marine where he worked as Program Manager and Director of Barge Construction. “John’s skills and judgment will be important to us as we build Senesco Marine into the best barge

BP Addresses Tanker Problems

BP's new fleet of oil tankers, already dogged by cracked rudders and missing anchors, now has a new glitch, according to a report on Fleet managers have been forced to replace mooring bitts on three of four ships after tests showed they were defective and one broke down. On Sept. 12, the tanker Alaskan Navigator was approaching the dock in Valdez when a bitt on the starboard bow broke off as a tug boat pulled on a mooring line, according to people with the U.S

U.S. Supreme Court Reject Exxon Appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected on an appeal by Exxon Mobil Corp. over the $5 billion punitive damages verdict against it for the 1989 Exxon Valdez accident, the nation's worst oil spill. The justices let stand a U.S. appeals court ruling that the award against the oil giant in a civil lawsuit brought by Alaskan fishermen and other plaintiffs should not be set aside because of irregularities during jury deliberations.

This Day in Naval History – April 6

1776 - Sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and 7 other vessels 1862 - Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union Troops at Battle of Shiloh 1909 - Commander Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole 1917 - U.S. declares war on Germany 1945 - First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 - USS Lake Champlain brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda.

New Chair Selected for MTS National Advisory Council

John Gaughan, Vice President of the American Maritime Congress, has been selected as the new chairman of the Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council (MTSNAC). Gaughan served in the White House as Deputy Assistant to the President and Director, White House Military Office, for Presidents Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush. He also served at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) as Maritime Administrator from 1985-1989 and as DOT Chief of Staff from 1989-1991.

Supreme Court Strikes Down Some Washington State Tanker Rules

Supreme Court Strikes Down Some Washington State Tanker Rules The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the federal government and tanker owners on March 6 by striking down parts of Washington state regulations aimed at preventing oil spills that damage the environment. The court agreed unanimously with the position taken by the U.S. Justice Department and the International Association of Independent Tanker Owners, stating that four key parts of the tanker regulations were preempted by federal

Single Hull Tanker Deadline Almost Agreed

Shipping legislators are close to agreeing a deadline for eliminating single-hulled tankers, a pollution hazard to the world's oceans and coastlines. "The deadline is 2015, but there's lots of ifs and buts," said a source, who sits a working group of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), shipping's self-regulated legislative body. "Now we'll have to put it before the committee and see what reaction we get," the source said

Canada To Study Ban On Pacific Ocean Drilling

An environmental group has criticized a move by British Columbia to study the idea of having Ottawa lift a 28-year-old ban on offshore drilling along Canada's pristine Pacific coast. An area near the Queen Charlotte Islands is believed to hold one of Canada's largest natural gas deposits, and business leaders in coastal region have said a drilling ban should be lifted to help the area's beleaguered economy. A report for the provincial government said there was enough public interest in the

The International Salvage Union Weighs In


Current issues in marine salvage: the ISU perspective. There have undoubtedly been great improvements in ship and operational safety in the past decades. SOLAS, the international Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, has been in force for more than 30 years and has played a large part

U.S., Alaska End Exxon Valdez Legal Action

The Exxon Valdez remains in place in Prince Williams Sound, Alaska after running aground on Bligh Reef March 23, 1989, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil (USCG photo)

U.S. and Alaskan authorities have ended their efforts to seek additional damages from Exxon Mobil Corp over the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill and the subsequent settlement, the Department of Justice said on Thursday. The department said in a statement that it is "bringing to a close the

A Tanker Statistic You May Not Know?

Graphics: Clarkson Research

 ‘VWGate’ has raised a flag for managers and technicians in the transport business. ‘Efficiency’ used to be left to the market, but the intrepid twins, consumer health and climate change, have changed all that, says a report from Clarkson Research Services.  

Cohen Retires from ExxonMobil, McCarron to Takeover

Ken Cohen Courtesy ExxonMobil

  Ken Cohen, vice president, Public and Government Affairs, Exxon Mobil Corporation, has announced his intention to retire effective Jan. 1, 2016, after more than 38 years of service. It is anticipated that the board of directors will elect Suzanne McCarron as vice president

Deepwater Horizon Spill Causes Fish Abnormalities

Oil near the Deepwater Horizon disaster spill source as seen during an aerial overflight on May 20, 2010. (Credit: NOAA)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that results to a new study conducted by a team of NOAA and academic scientists suggest that crude oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster causes severe defects in the developing hearts of bluefin and yellowfin tunas.

Energy Industry Needs Insurance Against Cyber Attacks

Energy companies have no insurance against major cyber attacks, reinsurance broker Willis said on Tuesday, likening the threat to a "time bomb" that could cost the industry billions of dollars. Willis highlighted the industry's vulnerability to cyber threats in its annual review of

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 14

The damaged hull of USS Samuel B. Roberts (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 14 1898 - Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace 1969 - North Korean aircraft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan 1988 - USS Samuel B. Roberts struck Iranian mine off Qatar

Crashes in Crucial US Crude Waterway Hit 10-year Low

USCG photo

Serious crashes in the bustling Bay of Galveston have fallen to the lowest level in a decade even as more oil moves on U.S. waterways, official data show, suggesting that better training and equipment are helping avert spills like one in March.

ICS Publishes Annual Review

ICS Chairman, Masamichi Morooka

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has published its latest Annual Review of maritime policy and regulatory developments in advance of its Annual General Meeting. The 2014 Annual Review covers the wide-ranging scope of ICS’s activities as the world’s principal

Patrick T. Mulva, VP & Controller, ExxonMobil, Retires

ExxonMobil image

  Patrick T. Mulva, vice president and controller of Exxon Mobil Corporation has announced his intention to retire on Sept. 1, 2014, after more than 38 years of service. Mulva, 63, joined Exxon Company U.S.A. in 1976 as a financial analyst at the company’s refinery in Baton Rouge

ExxonMobil's Board Elects Two Vice Presidents


  Exxon Mobil Corporation’s board of directors has elected David S. Rosenthal as vice president and controller and Jeffrey J. Woodbury as vice president of investor relations and secretary, effective Sept. 1. Rosenthal, 58, is currently vice president of investor relations and

Russia: Exxon Still Drilling in its Arctic

ExxonMobil is still drilling in the Russian Arctic, a Russian minister said on Friday, in move that if confirmed will anger Washington after the U.S. administration slapped sanctions on Moscow to suspend such operations by Western oil majors.

How Difficult is it to Obtain a Jones Act Waiver?

The American Salvage Association’s Jon Waldron provides the ultimate cabotage primer. There always seems to be constant chatter about waiving the Jones Act. In reality, it is a simple task to demystify the thought that it is easy to obtain such waivers

Editorial: BWTS. Like it or Not, Here it Comes

Gregory R. Trauthwein  Associate Publisher & Editor

With age comes perspective, and in my 20 plus years reporting on this industry I have seen my fair share of regulation that has served to ‘raise the hackles’ of ship owners. It is quite simple really; new regulation often means new procedure, new design, new equipment and new costs

Coast Guard Medevacs Mariner near Valdez

A mariner was medevaced by a U.S. Coast Guard Station Valdez, Alaska, boatcrew and a Valdez Fire Department emergency medical technician from the Valdez Narrows near Valdez, Tuesday morning.   The station’s 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew and a local EMT transferred the mariner to

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