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Great Lakes Shipyard Drydocks Fishery Research Vessel

RV Spencer F. Baird: Photo courtesy of Great Lakes Shipyard

Great Lakes Shipyard has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an agency of the Department of the Interior, for the 5-year drydocking and inspection of the R/V SPENCER F. BAIRD. The Shipyard hauled out the research ship using the 770-ton Marine Travelift. Work includes drydocking, a complete exterior repainting, bow thruster replacement, its five-year survey, and other miscellaneous repairs. The shipyard says that the project is to be completed early November 2013. Operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the 95-foot BAIRD is a fish stocking and population assessment vessel that will annually stock nearly 4 million lake trout into lakes Huron and Michigan, furthering a four-decade effort by the Service and its partners to restore depleted lake trout populations in the Great Lakes and establish self-sustaining populations of this native fish, which was nearly wiped out in the late 1950s due to invasion of sea lampreys, overfishing and pollution. According to Great Lakes Shipyard, of some 90 science vessels on the Great Lakes, the R/V SPENCER F. BAIRD is the only hatchery fish distribution vessel in operation, distributing fish reared at the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Iron River National Fish Hatchery in Wisconsin and Pendills Creek and Jordan River national fish hatcheries in Michigan


Great Lakes Shipyard Drydocks U.S. FWS Vessel

RV Spencer F. Baird

Great Lakes Shipyard was awarded a contract by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), an agency of the Department of the Interior, for the five-year drydocking and inspection of the RV Spencer F. Baird. The Shipyard hauled out the RV Spencer F. Baird using the 770-ton Marine Travelift. Work includes drydocking, a complete exterior repainting, bow thruster replacement, its five-year survey and other miscellaneous repairs. The project is expected to be complete by early November, 2013.


Tanker Stopped After Leaking Oil

An oil tanker owned by Exxon Mobil subsidiary SeaRiver Maritime was ordered back to Valdez on May 22 after developing a leak, the operator of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline said. The SeaRiver Long Beach was about 10 minutes into its journey from the Valdez marine terminal when crew members from an escort vessel spotted an oil sheen in its wake, said Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. The U.S. Coast Guard ordered the tanker back to the terminal, where it was surrounded with boom and examined


"The Future of Our Oceans"

Dr. Stephen M. Coan (Courtesy of the Sea Research Foundation)

On April 23, 2012, Dr. Stephen M. Coan delivered remarks entitled “The Future of Our Ocean”, part of the Open VISIONS Forum Lecture Series and presented at the Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts, Fairfield University, Fairfield, Conn. Following is the text of his speech. Water sustains life on Earth, and the health of our oceans, lakes, rivers, streams and marshlands, which cover 70% of the planet’s surface, is critically important to global economic and human health


Pump Efficiency Restored at Iceland Fish Farm

RagnarKarlsson of Velar (left) and Jon Andresson of Stofnfiskur (right)

Located in the Southwest corner of Iceland beside the Atlantic Ocean is one of Stofnfiskur’s salmon broodstockfarms. This farm located in a place called Vogar was originally established in 1986 produces Salmon Ova which are sold to domestic and International hatcheries for fish farming. The facility houses 25,000m3 tanks in 10 massive sheds used for the breeding of salmon and production of salmon ova. Each tank holds tens of thousands of liters of water delivered constantly by an


Deepwater Horizon Spill Causes Fish Abnormalities

Oil near the Deepwater Horizon disaster spill source as seen during an aerial overflight on May 20, 2010. (Credit: NOAA)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that results to a new study conducted by a team of NOAA and academic scientists suggest that crude oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster causes severe defects in the developing hearts of bluefin and yellowfin tunas. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill


 
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