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Longlining

J.K. Fabrication Winch Earns DNV Approval

Photo: J.K. Fabrication

J.K. Fabrication announced it has received DNV Type Approval on its Model 40-30-3000 Anchor Winch. The winch can now be specified into existing commercial applications on barges, tugs, fishing and yacht vessels around the world. The company said the new Arctic Prowler Longlining vessel, built in Ketchikan by Alaska Ship and Drydock (now Vigor Industrial) for Alaska Longline Company of Petersburg received this anchor winch. jkfabrication.com  


Fishing Boat Built with Cummins Engines

A.F.Theraiult of Meteghan River, Nova Scotia is building a 99.1-ft. steel fishing boat for Capt. Wesley Hennebery of Ivy Fisheries. To be powered by a Cummins KTA38 M1 main engine rated to 1,000 hp at 1,800 rpm, the boat will be rigged for harpooning, longlining and trawling. The main engine will drive through a ZF BW361 gear with a 6.16:1 ratio. Electrical power will be supplied by a 70 kW gen set powered by a Cummins 6BT 5.9 G2m engine


Cargo Handling: Molten Sulphur Tanker Sails Four Years Sans Freeze-Ups

The operator of the world’s largest and most modern molten sulphur tanker has enjoyed four years of near-continuous service, thanks in part to the ship’s innovative thermal maintenance system. Sulphur Carriers, Inc., a subsidiary of International Shipholding Corporation, keeps M/V Sulphur Enterprise at sea hauling around 24,000 long tons of molten sulphur per trip. “We’ve had zero freeze-ups and zero maintenance associated with the bolt-on piping and valve heating system,” says Peter Johnston


Second Longliner Installs Wesmar Stabalizers

Stabilizer-View_web.jpg

Woodinville, WA-9 Dec. 2008- Captain Rodney McVicker is the second West Coast longliner to install Wesmar stabilizers - a set of Wesmar 16-foot roll fin stabilizers on his 61-foot F/V Sundancer. McVicker says his Wesmar stabilizers provide more comfort and lessen fatigue for his crew. The three month albacore season, running from end of June to October, requires McVicker and his crew to constantly travel at sea each day.






 
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