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Maritime Security Regulations

MARAD Issues Report on Port and Shipping Safety

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) released its quarterly report on port and shipping safety and environmental protection. This report discusses the latest session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee; the bill to reauthorize the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21); the Coast Guard’s interim maritime security regulations; and the OECD report on Security in Maritime Transportation.


USCG Issues Screening Guidance

The U.S. Coast Guard issued voluntary screening guidance for owners and operators of vessels and facilities regulated under parts 104, 105, and 106 of the maritime security regulations. The guidance addresses screening of persons, cargo, vehicles, and baggage prior to allowing access to the vessel or facility. Details of the guidance are classified as security sensitive information (SSI) and will only be provided to those with a need to know. NVIC 06-04 (HK Law).


Confused Seas

Navigating through U.S. Maritime Security Requirements By Dennis L. Bryant Senior Maritime Counsel Holland & Knight, Washington, D.C. The U.S. Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) imposes various maritime security requirements on operating in waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. Maritime security regulations promulgated by the U.S. Coast Guard implement some (but not all) of the MTSA requirements and impose some additional requirements


USCG Port State Control Report

The U.S. Coast Guard released its annual Port State Control Report for calendar year 2004. During the year, 7,241 individual foreign ships made 72,178 calls at U.S. ports. The Coast Guard conducted 11,054 safety examinations of these ships. The detention level of 2.43% was higher than 2003, but lower than 2002. During the six month period in which the maritime security regulations were in force during the year, the agency conducted 6,087 security inspections, but detained, denied entry to


USCG Offers MTSA-ISPS Helpdesk

After the tragic events of 9/11, the United States faced the challenging task of creating new rules and policies to protect the homeland. In addition to many other actions, Congress and the Department of Homeland Security responded by passing and implementing the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) of 2002. The MTSA is a significant piece of legislation and its regulations affect nearly every member of the maritime community,


Controlling Maritime Security Cost

It is expected that the USCG will begin stepping up compliance measures and holding companies more accountable to the codes and regulations of the Maritime Security Act of 2002 (MTSA). The anticipated actions by the USCG, combined with the current cost of normal security procedures, will make it increasingly more difficult for companies to balance compliance with manageable security budgets. In addition, companies that lack the knowledge and experience to maintain full compliance run the risk


Lloyd’s Register Spreads the Word on Maritime Safety

Last week, the International Maritime Organization's (IMO's) 'Diplomatic Conference on Marine Security', held in London in parallel with MSC 76, adopted new Regulations to enhance maritime security through amendments to SOLAS Chapter XI, which now includes a new International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. On Monday this week, Lloyd's Register held the first in a global program of practical seminars aimed at helping the marine industry understand the implications of the


Deadline for new port security measures approaching

By Jonathan K. Waldron During a visit to Charleston, S.C. last month, President Bush touted his proposed 13 percent budget increase for homeland security with U.S. ports being a primary priority. The visit came just six months before these facilities must implement several domestic and international requirements intended to add additional layers of defense and protection from potential terrorist acts. These provisions are contained in the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (MTSA)


Legal Beat: At Sea with U.S. Maritime Security

By Dennis L. Bryant Senior Maritime Counsel, Holland & Knight The U.S. Coast Guard issued its final regulations implementing the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (MTSA). These regulations replace the interim rules issued on July 1, 2003 and take into account comments received thereon. Few substantive changes, though, have been made. The majority of the changes are in the nature of clarifications. The submission date for security plans was changed from December 29 to


Hearing: Environmental Regs’ Impacts on Maritime Transportion

The Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, chaired by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.), will hold a hearing next week examining the impacts of federal environmental regulations on maritime transportation. This will be the second part of a two-part hearing to review the status and potential ramifications of recent or proposed regulations by the United States Coast Guard, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC)


Erik Henriksen Quits Noreco's Chairmanship

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  Chairman of the Board Erik Henriksen has given notice of resignation from his position on the Board of Norwegian Energy Company ASA. The notice will be considered by the Board in due course in accordance with applicable regulations


Six Japanese Bulkers Fitted with BWMS

Joe Thomas, Ballast Water Treatment Director, Wärtsilä, and Katsushige Nakato, General Manager, Harison Sangyo Co., Ltd. (Photo: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä ballast water management systems will enable Japanese bulk carriers to achieve compliance with environmental regulations   Six new bulk carriers being built at the Namura and Onomichi shipyards in Japan are to be fitted with 12 Wärtsilä Aquarius UV ballast water


MARAD Considers Deepwater O&G Exports

A U.S. agency is considering how the country could export crude oil and natural gas from deepwater ports as the domestic drilling boom adds pressure for Washington to relax trade restrictions and approve shipments of fuel.   The U.S. Maritime Administration, or MARAD


NMEA Updates Installation Standards

2014 edition of NMEA 0400, Version 4.00 features extensive updates and new information   The National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) has published Edition 2014, Version 4.00 of the NMEA 0400 Installation Standard, which contains information on new technologies


EU Regulation on CO2 Reporting a Setback for ICS Efforts

ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe

  The global trade association for shipowners – the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) – is disappointed and concerned that the European Union is about to pre-empt negotiations taking place at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) on the collection of data on CO2


High Seas Becoming Less Secure

Peter Astbury - Senior Negotiator Ship and Yacht Contingency Response

  Despite the significant reduction in piracy attacks over the last few years it is now widely accepted by the maritime community that the safety of the High Seas cannot always be guaranteed by Governments. The future of security in the marine environment is about cooperation between the


Sulphur Regulation Enforcement Support Gathers Momentum

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Trident Alliance, the shipping industry initiative for robust enforcement of maritime sulphur regulations, broadens its platform as some of Germany’s and Denmark’s most prominent shipping companies join its ranks together with new members from Chile, Greece, The Netherlands, Sweden


EU Regs on Ship CO2 Reporting Complicates IMO Agreement

Peter Hinchliffe, ICS Secretary General

ICS Concerned that EU will Preempt IMO CO2 Negotiations.   The global trade association for shipowners – the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) – is disappointed and concerned that the European Union is about to pre-empt negotiations taking place at the International


Containers Must be Weighed Before Shipping

Containers to be wieghed before transport by ship

United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) has decided to make it mandatory to weigh loaded containers before they are transported by sea. This will enhance safety and prevent pollution of the marine environment. In the future


3rd Regional Maritime Crime Conference

Participants included prosecutors from Somalia, Djibouti, Seychelles, Mauritius, Yemen, Kenya, Tanzania, Zanzibar

The 4th prosecutors from around the Horn of Africa and Western Indian Ocean region have gathered in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, for the Third Regional Conference of Prosecutors dealing with Piracy and other Maritime Crime. They were joined by key international players working on capacity building


Maritime Guns For Hire Adapt to Changes in Sea Piracy

Somali pirate attacks down by 95 pct since 2011 -Maritime bureau. Cash-strapped maritime security firms are being forced to use fewer costly elite guards and to diversify into other businesses such as cyber security, as a steep decline in Somali pirate attacks and hotter competition erode


EUCAP Nestor Head of Mission visits Seychelles

EUCAP Nestor visits Seychelles

  On 4 and 5 December, EUCAP Nestor Head of Mission, Etienne de Poncins, visited EUCAP Nestor’s Country Office in the Seychelles. During his visit, he met several high officials to discuss the way ahead for the exemplary and successful cooperation between the Seychelles and the Mission


Australia & Fiji Close Ranks on Defense

Vice Chief of Australian Defence Force Vice Admiral Ray Griggs, (left)

The Vice Chief of the Defence Force, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs returned from a visit to Fiji today, the first visit from a senior Australian military representative in some years. The visit was an important step towards re-establishing a substantive defence relationship between Australia and Fiji


Proposed Rulemaking on Cruise Ship Terminal Security

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The Federal Register Wednesday published the U.S. Coast Guard’s notice of proposed rulemaking amending its regulations on cruise ship terminal security. This proposed rule would standardize screening activities for all persons, baggage and personal effects at cruise ship terminals while


Jones Act Gets Staunch Support

  The United States Congress this week enacted the strongest statement of support for the Jones Act and the American domestic maritime industry since the Merchant Marine Act of 1936. The measure was included as part of the National Defense Authorization Act (H.R






 
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