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Mission Package

Navy Rolls Out New Mine Warfare Mission Package

The Navy rolled out its new Mine Warfare Mission Package for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) in a ceremony on Sept. 14 at the ARINC Engineering Services facility near Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Panama City, Fla. Congressman F. Allen Boyd, Jr. (D-Fla.-2), leader of the Mine Warfare Caucus, Dr. Delores Etter, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition, and James Thomsen, Program Executive Officer Littoral and Mine Warfare, all spoke at the event. "These mission modules will revolutionize warfighting in the littorals and will fill critical requirement gaps that exist in the fleet today. We urgently need them as we continue to fight the Global War on Terrorism," said Etter. "I am extremely proud to be here for the rollout of the first Mine Warfare Mission Package. This is a momentous occasion." The Mine Warfare Mission Package is composed of sensors, weapons, unmanned vehicle technology and aircraft to locate, identify and destroy mines. It is designed to allow the Navy to clear sea mines, land U.S. Joint forces on hostile shores and operate ships in coastal areas known as the littorals. The Mine Warfare Mission Package is modular, scalable and allows the Navy to stay ahead of the threat and assure safe passage for commercial and military vessels. The LCS seaframe hosts a single focused Mission Package to counter Mine Warfare (MCM), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) or Surface Warfare (SUW) littoral threats.


Navy Christens Littoral Combat Ship Montgomery

LCS Montgomery (LCS 8) rolls out of Austal USAs assembly bay in Mobile, Alabama.

  The Navy will christen littoral combat ship (LCS) Montgomery Nov. 8 during a ceremony at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama.   Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Michelle Howard, will deliver the principal address at the ceremony. Mary Sessions, wife of U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (Alabama), will serve as the ship's sponsor. The ceremony will be highlighted by Sessions breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship


Navy Awards LCS Contracts to General Dynamics and Lockheed

Photo Credit: Austal The Navy has awarded General Dynamics Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. the final design contracts that could lead to orders for the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Work’s contract is worth $79M, and Lockheed’s is valued at $47M. The LCS is an entirely new breed of U.S. Navy warship. A fast, agile, and networked surface combatant, LCS’s modular, focused-mission design will provide


Navy Announces Flight 0 LCS Contract Awards

Lockheed Martin Corporation – Maritime Systems & Sensors, Moorestown, N.J. ($46,501,821) and General Dynamics - Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine ($78,798,188) are each being awarded contract options for final system design with options for detail design and construction of up to two Flight 0 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). "Today’s Littoral Combat Ship decision represents an important milestone for the warfighter and the acquisition team," said John Young


Navy Prepares Remote Minehunting System as Future Asset

The Navy completed technical evaluation and training of the Remote Minehunting System (RMS) aboard USS Bainbridge (DDG-96) in Panama City on July 28. The evaluation enables the Navy to continue training on the system, designed as part of the mine warfare mission package for the littoral combat ship. "This is all in preparation for the operational evaluation (OPEVAL) to be conducted in the South Florida Test Facility this September


USS Cincinnati Will Be Powered by GE Engines

LM2500 Engine (Photo: GE Marine)

GE Marine said its LM2500 marine engines will provide power for the U.S. Navy’s new Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), USS Cincinnati (LCS 20). USS Cincinnati’s two engines will be manufactured at GE’s Evendale, Ohio facility. Each LM2500 engine produces more than 29,500 horsepower, propelling the ship to speeds in excess of 40 knots or 46 miles per hour, the engine manufacturer said. “We are excited to learn that the U.S


The Littoral Combat Ship: Force Multiplier for the 21st Century

The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is a new ship design concept being considered to combat emerging threats in the littoral. It will be a relatively small, focused-mission combat ship that will revolutionize the way the U.S. Navy builds and fights ships. LCS, with its high speed, shallow draft, and maneuverability, will be optimized to serve as a force-multiplier for other larger, multi-mission ships. Old Problem/New Solution


Secretary of the Navy Recommends Way Ahead for LCS Program

The christening of the LCS-1. Based on a comprehensive review of the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) acquisition program, Secretary of the Navy Donald C. Winter announced March 15 that he is prepared to lift a previously issued stop work order for construction of LCS 3. The ship is currently under contract to Lockheed Martin Corp. Maritime Systems & Sensors unit, Moorestown, N.J. Lifting the stop work order is contingent upon the Navy and Lockheed Martin reaching agreement on a


USS Freedom Closer to Maiden Deployment

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

The Navy's first littoral combat ship (LCS), USS Freedom (LCS 1), has successfully completed another major milestone in preparation for her upcoming maiden deployment. Freedom conducted independent ship deployment training and certification at sea from Nov. 13-21, operating with ships from the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) Carrier Strike Group during their Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the southeastern coast of the United States.


US Navy Christens Future USS Detroit

Ships sponsor Barbara Levin breaks a bottle of champagne across the bow during the christening ceremony for the littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Detroit (LCS 7) at Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis. (U.S. Navy photo by Sam Shavers)

The U.S. Navy christened the future USS Detroit (LCS 7), the fourth Littoral Combat Ship of the Freedom variant, in a ceremony at Marinette Marine Shipyard in Marinette, Wisconsin, Oct. 18. The Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, delivered the principal address at the ceremony, and Barbara Levin served as the ship's sponsor. As ship sponsor, Levin is considered a permanent member of the ship's crew and is expected to advocate for the well-being of both ship and crew


Austal Hosts Littoral Combat Ship Gabrielle Giffords Christening

Littoral Combat Ship Gabrielle Giffords

  Austal joined the Honorable Gabrielle Giffords, her husband, retired Navy captain Mark Kelly, and ship’s sponsor Dr. Jill Biden in celebrating the christening of the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) today in Mobile, Alabama


Christening of LCS Little Rock

Littoral Combat Ship Little Rock

  The Navy’s newest littoral combat ship (LCS), the future USS Little Rock (LCS 9), will be christened Saturday, July 18, during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony at Marinette Marine Corporation's shipyard in Marinette, Wisconsin. The event will be webcast live at http://navylive.dodlive


Next LCS to be USS Cincinnati

Emblem

  Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that the next Independence variant littoral combat ship will be named USS Cincinnati (LCS 20). LCS 20 will be the fifth ship in naval history to be named Cincinnati with the first playing an integral part in the Civil War; the second


Naval Symposium Examines Ship Capabilities, Career Options

Vice Adm. Tom Rowden (E.H. Lundquist photo)

Warfighting ethos key to a distributed and lethal surface force   The annual Surface Navy Association (SNA) West Coast Symposium was held on the waterfront at Naval Station San Diego on July 16, and provided attendees an update on some key operational and career developments important to


USS Coronado Completes Final Contract Trials

USS Coronado (LCS 4). U.S. Navy photo by Keith DeVinney

USS Coronado (LCS 4) successfully completed final contract trials (FCT) June 6. The trial, administered by the U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey, is part of a series of post-delivery test and trial events through which the ship and its major systems are exercised.


US Navy Build Programs Face Budget Pressure

(U.S. Navy photo by Shelby F. W. West/Released)

Ship construction programs move ahead, but it’s not smooth sailing. Navies and Coast Guards everywhere face budgetary pressure, even in the U.S. which has the largest Navy in the world. The balance between desire for capacity and capability and pressure for affordability has never been


Leidos Constructing AUV Anti-Submarine Warfare Tracker

Leidos engineers: Image courtesy of Leidos video frame

National security, health & engineering solutions company, Leidos, says it has under construction an autonomous unmanned vessel designed to track quiet diesel-electric submarines spanning miles of ocean depths for months at a time with minimal human input, and due for testing at sea in 2015.


LCS MCM MP Puts Navy Closer to Fleet Implementation

It’s All in the Package the Littoral Combat Ship’s Mission Modules

NSWC Panama City hosted a two-week demonstration in July that verified Sailors' ability to conduct maintenance on the Littoral Combat Ship's Mine Countermeasure Mission Package without the assistance of civilian scientists or engineers.  


RIMPAC Exercise Puts LCS Through Paces

No Drama The littoral combat ship Independence is seen here on plane guard duty with the aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan during the Rim of the Pacific exercise in July, marking the first time a ship of this class operated

  It was the middle of May, and the littoral combat ship Independence was operating out of San Diego, testing components of the mine warfare mission package. The mission is one that, except for several extended overhaul periods, has consumed much of the ship’s operating time since the


US Navy to Christen Littoral Combat Ship Detroit

Photo: Lockheed Martin

The Navy will christen littoral combat ship (LCS) Detroit, on Oct. 18 during a ceremony at Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard in Marinette, Wisconsin. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, will deliver the principal address at the ceremony, and Barbara Levin, wife of U.S


USS Fort Worth Arrives in US 7th Fleet

The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) provides a sea-going platform for a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter from U.S. Army 25th Combat Aviation Brigade to conduct deck landing qualifications off the coast of Hawaii. Fo

Littoral combat ship (LCS) USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) arrived in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations Dec. 4, marking a key initial milestone in its 16-month rotational deployment in support of the Indo-Asia-Pacific rebalance. Building on USS Freedom's (LCS 1) inaugural 10-month deployment from


Transas Simulator Installed at the Istanbul University

Photo courtesy of Transas Marine

Istanbul University has received a multipurpose simulator complex from Transas Marine. The package includes a full mission navigational simulator NTPRO 5000 and a four-workplace multifunction simulator class that will enable training in shiphandling


Northrop Grumman to Deliver Navy LCS Mission Packages

Northrop Grumman Corporation (NOC) has received a $21.6 million contract from the U.S. Navy for two additional Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) mission packages  As the mission package integrator, the company will deliver one mission package for surface warfare and one for mine countermeasures.


USN Names Littoral Combat Ship

Freedom-variant littoral combat ship

  Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that the next Freedom-variant littoral combat ship (LCS) will be named USS St. Louis. The future USS St. Louis, designated LCS 19, will be the seventh ship to bear the name. The first St. Louis, a sloop of war, was launched in 1828


USS Freedom (LCS 1) Completes Rough Water Trials

USS Freedom (LCS 1) in the Southern California operating area. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) completed Seakeeping and Structural Loads Trials, commonly referred to as Rough Water Trials (RWT) in late March the Navy reported May 21. The U.S. Navy must demonstrate the seaworthiness and structural integrity of each new ship class






 
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