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Navy Budget

Report: Lockheed Could Lose LCS Contract

Adm. Michael Mullen, the Navy's Chief of Naval Operations, said Thursday that Lockheed Martin Corp. could lose part of its Littoral Combat Ship contract, depending on the results of a pending review, as reported in Business Week. Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin is on contract to build two ships, dubbed LCS 1 and LCS 3. The first ship is under construction and considerably over budget, which recently prompted the Navy to halt work on LCS 3. The Navy is on course to decide in the next few weeks whether to move to termination or to continue the program for LCS 3 according to reports. The Navy plans to build 55 of the new ships, which are designed to hunt mines, submarines and small enemy boats in coastal waters. The service hasn't yet decided whether it wants to settle on just one design or keep competition through the life of the program. Mullen said shipbuilding is a big priority for the Navy, but new ships need to be affordable. He welcomed comments from lawmakers like Rep. John Murtha, D-Pa., and Rep. Gene Taylor, D-Miss., in support of adding ships to the Navy's budget. But he said it isn't clear exactly how the Navy could bulk up its fleet without disrupting its current shipbuilding plan and budget outlook. For example, Mullen said the Navy believes the best course for its Virginia-class submarines is to build just one vessel per year until 2012


Torpedo and Missile Attack Vessel Launched in Italy

Admiral of the Fleet Sergio Biraghi described the new Torpedo and Missile Attack Vessel – dubbed Andrea Doria – at the launching ceremony as a “ jewel of the most advanced and sophisticated technology which forms an important part of the navy’s fleet renewal program.” The ship was launched at the Riva Trigosa yard in Genoa on October 14, 2005, three years after the first plate was cut. Biraghi said “the plan put into action in the last few years in an extremely decisive manner will make


Shipbuilding Industry Bears Brunt of Cuts in Pentagon Budget

Strained by the demands of a major ground war and a sweeping overhaul of U.S. forces for an uncertain future, the Pentagon faces a severe budget challenge. According to the Providence Journal, while Congress and the Bush administration are working on a very large spending program for the military, the outlay for shipbuilding will be tight -- a prospect that is hurting the industry. The Navy's problem, says one Washington analyst, is not a lack of ships


Builders Prepare To Shape The New Navy

The team of General Dynamics and Lockheed Martin said they strongly support the U.S. Navy's plan for the next generation of surface combatant ships referred to as DD(X). The Blue Team has developed technologies relevant to the DD(X) requirement and is preparing its response to the Navy's request for proposal (RFP). DD(X) will be a technology engine that will drive a family of combatants to transform the Navy. The Navy will use the advanced technology and networking capabilities from DD(X)


UPDATE: Several Injured, Reports of Fatalities in Navy Yard Shooting

An undated file photo of an aerial view of the Washington Navy Yard. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

WASHINGTON  -- Several people were injured and there are reports of fatalities in a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard Sept. 16. An active shooter was reported inside the Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters building (Bldg. 197) on the Washington Navy Yard at 8:20 a.m. (Eastern Time). Emergency personnel remain on scene and a "shelter in place" order has been issued for Navy Yard personnel. The Naval Sea Systems Command's headquarters is the work place for about 3


Navy Cuts One Littoral Combat Ship in 2015

 U.S. Navy Aims To Smooth Impact Of Fiscal 2015 Cut To Ship Orders   Add to Collection(Oil)|Print Download:Plain TextXMLAll         WASHINGTON, April 10 (Reuters) - The U.S. Navy hopes to smooth out the impact on Lockheed Martin Corp and Australia's Austal of a budget-driven decision to order three Littoral Combat Ships instead of four in fiscal year 2015, the Navy's top weapons buyer said on Thursday.  


Ship Repair Yards Ask: Where's the Funding?

While much of the focus is trained on Naval new construction, the fact is that repair and maintenance on the existing U.S. Navy fleet has reached condition critical.Cutbacks from the Navy have left many vessels of its 300-member fleet to go without required repairs and maintenance because the money is not budgeted. Yards may however, find some relief at the end of this month, dependent upon whether Congress passes a supplemental bill for additional funding.


CNO Calls Shipbuilding Plan Top Budget Priority

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Mullen talks with Government Executive Magazine Editor Tim Clark, during a leadership breakfast at the National Press Club. The CNO addressed senior leaders from several federal agencies and organizations about the future and transformation of the Navy. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera The Navy’s shipbuilding plan is the key to the fleet’s future and is critical for the joint force, Chief of Naval Operations Adm


Navy’s Shipbuilding Budget Increased

The Navy will enjoy its biggest shipbuilding budget surge since the end of the Cold War — including money to speed production of submarines — under a $459.3b defense spending bill that President Bush recently signed into law. The Pentagon spending bill for the fiscal year that began Oct. 1 totals slightly less than Mr. Bush sought but it raises military pay and health benefits plus spending for the National Guard and reserves beyond what he requested. The bill also represents a hike of 9


Budget Worries Delay U.S. Carrier Group Deployment

US Defense Sec. & Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff

The Secretary of Defense delays the scheduled deployment of 'USS Harry S. Truman' & 'USS Gettysburg'. The affected ships have begun formally notifying the men and women of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) that they will not be deploying. 

"Facing budget uncertainty - including a Continuing Resolution and the looming potential for across-the-board sequestration cuts - the U.S. Navy made this request to the Secretary and he approved


U.S. Navy to Test Electromagnetic Rail Gun at sea in 2016

(U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)

The U.S. Navy is planning sea trials for a weapon that can fire a low-cost, 23-pound (10-kg) projectile at seven times the speed of sound using electromagnetic energy, a "Star Wars" technology that will make enemies think twice, the Navy's research chief said.


CNO Addresses Payloads, Platforms at Sea-Air-Space

(U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Peter D. Lawlor/Released)

The Navy's top admiral joined his sea service counterparts to discuss the importance of the sea services at the Sea-Air-Space Service Chief Update Panel today. Speaking to members of national and international defense industries, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm


SSI Speaks in Washington about LCS Program Cuts

Image courtesy SSI

SSI USA Director of Operations Patrick Roberts recently had meetings with U.S. senators, congressmen and navy brass to discuss the upcoming Pentagon Department of Defense Budget as it relates to the U.S. Navy shipbuilding programs. It was noted that Roberts' position is somewhat unique in that


US Sens. Kaine and Reed Visit Newport News Shipbuilding

Pictured with U.S. Sens. Tim Kaine and Jack Reed  in front of USS Abraham Lincoln are (left to right) Capt. Karl Thomas, the ship’s commanding officer; Todd West, director, Newport News’ RCOH program; and Chris Miner, Newport News’ vice president of in-service aircraft carrier programs. Photo by Chris Oxley, Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) hosted U.S. Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Jack Reed (D-R.I.) Tuesday for a tour of the company's Newport News Shipbuilding division. The visit provided the senators an opportunity to meet shipbuilders and see construction progress being made on all programs across


China's Civilian Fleet a Potent Force in Disputed Seas

Photo: Reuters

By Megha Rajagopalan and Greg Torode, Reuters From harassing Filipino fishing boats and monitoring oil exploration off Vietnam to playing cat-and-mouse with the Japanese coastguard, China's expanding fleet of civilian patrol vessels have become the enforcers in disputed Asian waters.


China's civilian fleet a potent force in Asia's disputed seas

From harassing Filipino fishing boats and monitoring oil exploration off Vietnam to playing cat-and-mouse with the Japanese coastguard, China's expanding fleet of civilian patrol vessels have become the enforcers in disputed Asian waters.


U.S. Navy awards contracts to Lockheed, Austal for 4 more ships

File Photo: LCS hulls 4 & 6 alongside the pier at Austal Shipyard..

The U.S. Navy has awarded contracts worth nearly $1.4 billion to buy four more Littoral Combat Ships from Lockheed Martin Corp and Australia's Austal Ltd, the U.S. Defense Department said on Monday. Lockheed won a contract valued at $699 million to build two more of its steel monohull-design


US Navy Braces for Budget Cut Battles

USS Gerald Ford: Image credit NNS

Reuters –  Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert told reporters late on Monday that the Navy would have no choice but to curtail funding for a planned refueling of the nuclear-powered USS George Washington aircraft carrier if sharp cuts in military spending remained in


Online Monitoring Systems Can Improve Your Bottom Line

Rich Merhige

All operators, regardless of vessel type, size, location or function, are plagued by the same worries: “When will my next outage happen, and what is it going to cost me?”  In an effort to ease these concerns, millions of dollars are invested every year into commercial/workboat


UK Budget 2014 Good News for Shipping: Analysts

Chancellor of the Exchequer: Rt Hon George Osborne MP: Official photo

The UK government’s Budget 2014, issued on 19 March 2014, is good news for UK shipping as it ensures the continuation of a stable UK tax regime for shipping, as has been the case for the past few years, according to international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens.


Georgia Increases Funding for Port Deepening

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Deal to Sign Budget with $35M More for Port Deepening; State has allocated $266 million to Savannah Harbor Expansion The $35 million in additional port deepening funds proposed by Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal has been approved by the state legislature and now awaits the governor’s signature


Moore Director Declines Permanent Position at Port of L.A.

Photo: The Port of Los Angeles

Interim Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Gary Lee Moore announced today that he will not apply for the permanent position. After an executive director is selected and in place, Moore will return to his duties as Los Angeles City Engineer.


Navy's Efforts Focus on A-P Region & Arabian Gulf Says CNO

ADM Greenert at the Hearing: USN Photo

By operating from forward locations, the Navy and Marine Corps provide President Barack Obama with options to deal promptly with global contingencies, Navy Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, the chief of naval operations (CNO) explained during a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee's defense


Virginia Leads US in Shipbuilding Jobs

Alexander Manning pulls a piece of track into position at Newport News Shipbuilding under a transfer car for the submarine John Marner (SSN 785). Photo by Chris Oxley

State maritime industry supports more than 63,000 jobs; worth over $5.5 billion annually to Virginia’s economy The American Maritime Partnership (AMP) today joined with the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA), Senator Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Congressman Rob Wittman (R-Va


U.S. Navy to Test 'Star Wars' Technology at Sea in 2016

USNS Millinocket at the Austal USA vessel completion yard in June 2013 U.S. Navy photo Courtesy Austa)

The U.S. Navy is planning sea trials for a weapon that can fire a low-cost, 23-pound (10-kg) projectile at seven times the speed of sound using electromagnetic energy, a "Star Wars" technology that will make enemies think twice, the Navy's research chief said.


 
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