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Right Whale

NOAA, USCG Provide Commercial Mariners with Guide to Right Whale Protection

The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service and the U.S. Coast Guard announce the availability of "A Prudent Mariner's Guide to Right Whale Protection" - an interactive, multi-media CD program that serves as a guide and voluntary training resource for commercial mariners operating in right whale habitats along the U.S. Atlantic coast. The CD, distributed free-of-charge upon request, provides a comprehensive collection of right whale information delivered in a compact and user-friendly format. The program includes: crew training information about right whales, recommended navigational actions when operating in right whale habitat, a guide to reporting sightings of dead or injured right whales, an informative video presentation, and a short follow-up quiz. It also provides guidelines for compliance with the Mandatory Ship Reporting Systems, including an innovative, interactive report generation program, as well as key supplementary information contained in a separate "Media" folder, such as video clips, information about the current Mandatory Ship Reporting areas, and diagrams of the recently implemented, recommended traffic lanes in right whale high-use areas. NOAA Fisheries, in collaboration with the Coast Guard and a number of other partners, developed the CD program and is currently targeting shipping companies and vessel operators who plan to ensure the CDs are delivered directly to vessels and included in bridge management training


Changes in Vessel Operations Protects Whales

Years of study and effort by NOAA and the U.S. Coast Guard will pay off this summer when two changes to shipping lanes into Boston are implemented. Both changes significantly reduce the risk of collisions between large ships and whales. Beginning on June 1, ships 300 gross tons and above will be asked to avoid an area in the Great South Channel from April through July, when right whales face the highest chance of being struck by ships


North Atlantic Right Whale – port access routing study

The U.S. Coast Guard is conducting a port access routing study to analyze potential vessel routing measures and consider adjusting existing vessel routing measures in order to reduce vessel strikes on the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale. The areas under consideration include Cape Cod Bay and possibly Race Point and the Great South Channel in the northern region and approaches to Jacksonville, Fernandina Beach, and Brunswick in the southern region


This Day in Coast Guard History – May 17

1999-The Coast Guard "kept the peace" when the Makah Indian tribe hunted and killed a gray whale in Neah Bay, Washington.  The Makah were guaranteed the right to hunt whales in their 1855 treaty with the U.S. (Source: USCG Historian’s)


Avoiding Collisions with the North Atlantic Right Whale

“Since implementation of mandatory seasonal speed restrictions along the U.S. east coast in 2008, the number of vessel struck right whales like this one has been dramatically reduced.”

A Training Module for all Mariners Professional mariners have a unique responsibility as they transit the world’s oceans. Mariners see a part of this earth that the vast majority of humanity will never witness and, in turn, they become stewards of the ocean by following the numerous regulatory measures aimed at reducing the impact of shipping on the environment. These regulations include, but certainly are not limited to, the use of AIS to avoid collisions and harmful oil spills


Deep-Water Rig Can Expect Unfriendly NZ Reception

SV Tiama: Photo credit Greenpeace NZ

New Zealand environmentalists wait patiently aboard their yacht 'SV Tiama' for the arrival of Texas' Anadarko rig 'Noble Bob Douglas' at the deep-sea drilling site about 110 nm west of Raglan. Crew member Bunny McDiarmid sets the scene in her blog post: "Out on the Tasman it is still, sunny and calm. The water has been so flat lately that, ironically, it’s technically known as "oily seas" because there’s a sheen over the water


Blue Whale Operations Update

Coast Guard District Eleven continues to support the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in conducting overflights to monitor the locations of blue whales in the Santa Barbara Channel and surrounding area. This information is being passed to vessel agents to increase industry awareness. Since September 8, 2007, two blue whale carcasses have been discovered in the Santa Barbara Channel, and one was discovered in Long Beach Harbor


Court Strikes New Balance for Navy, Whales

The U.S. Navy can go ahead with training exercises this month using sonar off the California coast but should afterward implement new guidelines to protect whales, a U.S. appeals court said, according to a Reuters report. For years, U.S. courts have weighed the rights of whales to live undisturbed versus U.S. national security needs. The order of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was the latest effort to strike the right balance.


NOAA Issues Whale Advisory to Mariners

(Photo: Whale Alert ©John Calambokidis)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) broadcasted an advisory concerning populations of endangered whales off the coast of California, stating large numbers of endangered whales are being observed along the coastline.   Voluntary vessel speed reduction zones are currently in effect for the San Francisco and Santa Barbara traffic separation schemes (TSS).    NOAA is asking mariners to help track whales by reporting whale sightings


Seventh Whale Stranded Off Norfolk Coastline

A seventh whale has been reported in shallow water off the coast of Mundesley, Norfolk this morning, February 9.   A member of the Mundesley Coastguard Rescue Team contacted the UK Coastguard just after 10 a.m. this morning to report the whale was 300-400 yards off shore.  The whale, which is the seventh whale in that area, was reported to be alive and thrashing about in the shallow water.   UK Coastguard has alerted Happisburgh and Mundesley Coastguard Rescue Teams who are


First Steel Cut for Norwegian Bliss

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. President and Chief Executive Officer Frank Del Rio (center) joins NCLH Executive Vice President of Vessel Operations Robin Lindsay (right) and MEYER WERFT Managing Partner Bernard Meyer

Norwegian Cruise Line is celebrating the cutting of the first piece of steel for Norwegian Bliss, the line’s sixteenth vessel and the first one designed for the ultimate Alaska cruising experience. Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings and MEYER WERFT executives gathered at the MEYER WERFT Laser


Maritime Trivia: November

Maritime Trivia.jpg

MarineLink.com brings you a monthly maritime trivia question courtesy of The Marine Art of J. Clary. Here's the question for November 2016: When was the last time an actual whale was sited on the Great Lakes? Simply email your guess to haun@marinelink


Denmark to Go through with Near-shore Wind Farms

Denmark's right-wing minority government bowed to pressure from opposition parties and approved plans to build two near-shore wind farms, despite its earlier objections it said on Thursday.   After granting building rights for the wind farms to Swedish wind farm developer Vattenfall in


Obama Administration Bars New Oil, Gas Exploration off Alaska

A drilling ship Polar Pioneer in the Chukchi Sea, August 2015 (Photo: Mark Fink / Shell)

The Obama administration on Friday blocked new exploration for oil and gas in Arctic waters, in a win for environmental groups that had fought development of the ecologically fragile region.   The Department of the Interior released a 2017 to 2022 leasing plan that blocked drilling in the


Whale-watching Catamaran Repowered by Volvo Penta

Photo: Volvo Penta

When it came time to replace the old engines in his whale-watching vessel, Capt. Joe Nazar chose Volvo Penta and has enjoyed the benefits of improved fuel efficiency, lower emissions, reduced noise levels and better performance ever since.  


This Day In Naval History: May 26

1943 - USS Saury (SS 189) attacks a Japanese convoy south of Kyushu and sinks transport Kagi Maru, about 10 miles north of the Nansei Shoto. Also on this date, USS Whale (SS 239) sinks Japanese gunboat Shoei Maru (which is transporting men of the Guam Base Detachment) about 17 miles


BOURBON to Pay Dividend for 2015

Bourbon - A world leader in marine services for offshore oil and gas Photo Bourbon

The Annual General Meeting of BOURBON shareholders held on May 26, 2016 approved the payment of the dividend for 2015 of €1.00 per share and that each shareholder can choose to receive the dividend either in cash or in new shares. The period for exercising the option ran from June 15


This Day In Naval History: July 14

1813 - During the War of 1812, Lt. John M. Gamble becomes the first Marine to command a ship in battle, USS Greenwich, when she captures British whaling ship Seringapatam.    1853 - Commodore Matthew C. Perry lands and holds the first meeting with the Japanese at Uraga


U.S. to Crack Down on Ocean Noise that Harms Fish

Richard Merrick, chief science adviser to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Photo NOAA

The ocean has gotten noisier for decades, with man-made racket from oil drilling, shipping and construction linked to signs of stress in marine life that include beached whales and baby crabs with scrambled navigational signals. The United States aims to change that as a federal agency prepares


18 Saved from Whale-watching Boat off Alaska

Eighteen people were rescued from a 35-foot whale-watching motor vessel taking on water in Favorite Channel near Juneau, Alaska, Sunday afternoon, the U.S. Coast Guard reported.   Watchstanders from Coast Guard Sector Juneau received a call from a crewmember of the whale-watching vessel Big


Bolivia's Morales Accuses Chile of Restricting Access to Ports

Bolivian President Evo Morales told the United Nations Human Rights Council on Friday that Chile had restricted access to ports on its coast in violation of free passage treaties, in the latest flare-up of tensions between the traditional rivals.  


Silence Your Ships

Plymouth University Marine Institute scientists are working with AutoNaut on a project studying how increasing levels of manmade noise in the sea is affecting marine life. (Photo: AutoNaut)

Anthropogenic (manmade) sound is creating havoc among marine mammals and other aquatic species. These creatures have very sensitive hearing, which they rely on to find food and mates and (for some) to communicate and navigate. Sound waves can travel much further and with much less loss of strength


Beta Release of Safe, Efficient Data Exchange at Sea

Effiensea2 Image Danish Maritime Authority

The EfficienSea2 project, which is led by the Danish Maritime Authority, is now ready to demonstrate its first results. At a coming conference, beta releases of some of the solutions will be launched. Now, the EfficienSea2 project is ready to present beta releases of some of its solutions


Japan, Allies Block Proposal for South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary

Photo: IWC

Countries led by Japan on Tuesday blocked a move by South American and African states to create a South Atlantic sanctuary for whales they say are endangered by hunting despite a global moratorium in force for 30 years. The proposal brought by five African and South American countries would


Antarctica’s Ross Sea Gets Protection

Commission on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) today agreed to set aside more than 1 million square kilometres of the Ross Sea Image ASOC

The Commission on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) today agreed to set aside more than 1 million square kilometres of the Ross Sea in recognition of its incredible scientific and biodiversity values.   CCAMLR committed to creating a system of marine protected






 
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