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Safety Violations

Coast Guard Cites Vessel Master for Safety Violations

A Coast Guard boarding team cited the master of a commercial fishing vessel with safety violations Tuesday off the coast of Atlantic City, resulting in the termination of the vessel's voyage and restriction to A law enforcement boarding team from the Coast Guard Cutter Ibis boarded the 70-foot commercial fishing vessel Lady Kimberly, fishing for summer flounder, about 63 miles east of Atlantic City. In the course of the boarding, the team found that the vessel lacked a general emergency alarm, a Coast Guard-approved flare and any sound-producing device. These are federally-mandated safety regulations that the Coast Guard routinely checks for when they conduct safety boardings. Additionally, the vessel's auto-inflatable liferaft was stowed in a manner that did not allow for it to float free if the vessel was to suddenly capsize or sink. These four safety violations were enough for the Coast Guard to terminate the crew's voyage and order the vessel to shore. The crew of the Ibis escorted the vessel toward Atlantic City where they were met by a Coast Guard Station Atlantic City boatcrew who completed the escort into the station, arriving at about 9 a.m. today. The master, Lindsey Tate, was issued a Captain-of-the-Port Order, which, under the authority of the Ports and Waterways Safety Act, restricts the vessel to shore until the discrepancies can be corrected and verified as such.


Safety Violations Terminates Voyage

Coast Guard law enforcement officials terminated a fishing vessel’s voyage Tuesday afternoon in Southeast Alaska waters after the boat’s captain failed to meet federally required safety equipment regulations. Boarding officers from the Petersburg-based cutter Anacapa boarded the 37-foot vessel Charisma at about 10 a.m. near Takatz Bay in Chatham Strait. The Coast Guard officials cited Charisma’s operator for safety equipment violations that included unserviceable survival suits


Coast Guard Detains Ship in Seward for Safety Violations

The Coast Guard detained the Arctic Transport in Seward Wednesday for five safety violations. Tom Rebar, skipper of the Arctic Transport, informed the Coast Guard Monday that the 203-foot ship was experiencing engine problems. The vessel departed Seattle days earlier and was in the Gulf of Alaska when it experienced engine problems and flooding. The Coast Guard cutter Mustang responded to the stricken vessel and escorted it to Seward at 6 a.m. Tuesday.


Tanker Captain Charged In San Francisco

The captain of an oil tanker that arrived in the San Francisco Bay with safety violations, including risky oil leaks, was charged on with falsifying documents and lying to Coast Guard inspectors. The Greek captain, who speaks little English, was arrested over the weekend after his Singapore-registered Neptune Dorado was found with oil in the ship's ballast tanks. If ignited, vapors from the oil could have caused the ship to explode, officials said


Tanker Captain Bail Set At $500K

A U.S. judge set $500,000 bail for a Greek tanker captain charged with falsifying documents and lying to U.S. Coast Guard inspectors after his ship was found in San Francisco Bay with numerous safety violations, including risky oil leaks. U.S. Magistrate Joseph Spero set a Friday hearing to determine conditions for Capt. Kiriakos Daioglou's release if he is able to post bail, local news reports said. Daioglou was also ordered to remain in the United States at least until a bail review hearing


USCG Detains 553-foot Vessel for Safety Violations

Great Success (Photo: Glenn Towler)

The Coast Guard detained the motor vessel Great Success, Tuesday,  requiring the vessel remain in Longview, Wash., until numerous safety violations are corrected by the ship’s crew. Port State Control officers from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River’s Marine Safety Unit in Portland, Ore., discovered the discrepancies during routine inspections of the 553-foot Hong Kong-flagged vessel in Kalama, Wash., Monday and Longview on Tuesday.


USCG Detains Foreign Freight Vessel Again

USCG inspectors in Dutch Harbor detained 281-ft. freight ship Jacha for the third time since Aug. 1998 due to Safety of Life At Sea violations (SOLAS). Inspectors found seven discrepancies aboard 14-year-old Jacha, including fire doors that didn't close properly, an incompetent fire drill and water leaks on the vessel's main engine. Due to Jacha's history of safety discrepancies, this time, it is not permitted to conduct any cargo operations


Seabees Build on Combat Skills

Dusty and hot: that's April in Kuwait. These are perfect conditions for a day on the firing range, where the training department of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133 spends plenty of time. The department is responsible for training every Seabee who comes through Kuwait. On this particular day, NMCB 28 received Enhanced Marksmanship Training, a course of fire which includes training in combat movement, search and assess procedures


Coast Guard Terminates Voyage for Fishing Vessel

The Coast Guard Cutter Cuttyhunk terminated the voyage of the 32-ft. fishing vessel Duffy Sunday. The master, Todd Cannon of Everett, was retrieving and setting crab pots in Possession Sound, south of Whidbey Island. A Coast Guard boarding team from the Cuttyhunk conducted a safety inspection and found significant violations. Specifically, the Duffy had expired flares, only one fire extinguisher, and no official identification markings on the boat's hull.


Shell Protesters Cited for Entering Safety Zone

U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Sector Puget Sound investigating officers initiated civil penalties, Friday, against four individuals who entered an established safety-zone around a Shell-contracted vessel in Bellingham during Memorial Day weekend.   Cody Erdman, Chiara D’Angelo, Paul Adler and Matthew Fuller were cited in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations for entry into or staying in a federally-regulated safety zone between May 22 and 24.  


Oceaneering Wins NOIA Safety Award

NOIA Awards Image NOIA

The National Ocean Industries Association (NOIA) today named Oceaneering International, Inc. as the recipient of the 2016 Safety-in-Seas (SIS) Safety Practice Award.  Kevin McEvoy, CEO of Oceaneering International, accepted the award at the NOIA annual meeting in Washington, DC.  


Adventure Runner Calls off Voyage at Sea

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Gannet speak with a man within a hydro pod off the coast of Jupiter, Florida, April 24, 2016. After speaking with the crew aboard the Gannet, Reza Baluchi agreed to end his voyage Bermuda and safely embarked the cutter. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The second attempt by an endurance runner hoping to reach Bermuda from Miami ended early Sunday when he asked to be removed from his "hydro pod."   The runner ignored a previously issued order from U.S. Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP) to not depart on his seagoing journey


World Marine Earns SCA Safety Awards

World Marine, LLC has received the Shipbuilders Council of America’s (SCA) annual “Excellence in Safety” award as well as the “Improvement in Safety” award. SCA, the national association representing the U.S. shipyard industry


USCG Sets 2nd Round of Hearings for El Faro

El Faro (File photo: TOTE)

The U.S. Coast Guard will conduct a second round of public hearings May 16-27 for the Marine Board of Investigation into the loss of the U.S.-flagged cargo ship El Caro, and its 33 crewmembers.    The Coast Guard completed its first round of hearings in February 2016.


Subchapter M: The Designated Person Ashore and You

Sweeney

As the workboat industry marches toward Subchapter M, and ever closer to the International Safety Management (ISM) Code, the appointment of a Designated Person Ashore (DPA) becomes more important, the position’s job functions become more defined


U.S. Coast Guard's El Faro Probe Starts Today

File image: El Faro (Tote)

The U.S. Coast Guard begins hearings on Tuesday to investigate whether misconduct or negligence were factors in the sinking of the cargo ship El Faro during a hurricane last fall, an accident that left the vessel's 33 crew members dead. The 790-foot (241-meter) El Faro went down off the Bahamas


US Coast Guard Hearing Probes El Faro Sinking in Hurricane

El Faro file photo: Tote

The captain of the U.S. cargo ship that sank off the Bahamas in a hurricane last fall, killing all 33 people on board, was responsible for decisions that put the vessel in the path of the storm, a shipping company executive testified on Tuesday.  


APM Terminals Buenos Aires Wins Safety Award

APM Terminals Buenos Aires wins Innovation in Safety Award Photo APM Terminals

ICHCA’s inaugural International ‘Innovation in Safety’ Award was presented in recognition of APM Terminals Buenos Aires Terminal 4’s “Safety Logging System”.   Barcelona, Spain – APM Terminals Buenos Aires


Wärtsilä Admits Manipulation on Ship Engine Fuel Tests

President and CEO Jaakko Eskola. Courtesy   Wärtsilä Corporation

Wärtsilä internal audit reveals deviations in a limited number of fuel consumption tests of marine engines Wärtsilä Corporation has, at its own initiative, conducted an internal audit of test processes globally. This was done to secure compliance and to ensure operational


California Fines Shipper for Clean Air Violations

The California Air Resources Board has fined the China Navigation Co. Pte. Ltd. $129,500 for failure to switch its engines over from heavy diesel bunker fuel to cleaner, low-sulfur fuel when close to the California coast, as required by state law


Safety Violations Halt Three Fishing Voyages

Three commercial fishing vessels operating throughout Puget Sound were ordered to return to port Wednesday after U.S. Coast Guard boarding teams discovered multiple safety violations.    Following the boardings, the Coast Guard Captain of the Port for Sector Puget Sound sent the three


Shipyards Leading the Way on Safety in OSHA Partnership

Photo: SCA

The Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA) has announced a new partnership with the National Shipbuilding Research Program and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), a part of the Department of Labor (DOL), focused on continuing employee safety practices in U.S. shipyards.


Korea's Doorae Shipping Fined $750K for Illegal Discharge

Sunrise off of Oahu. (Photo: Greg Trauthwein)

United States District Court Judge Leslie E. Kobayashi accepted the guilty plea of Doorae Shipping Co., LTD, a South Korean maritime operations company, and sentenced the company to pay a fine of $750,000, a community service payment of $200,000


Fishing Vessel Owner, Captain Face Environmental Charges

Owner and captain of commercial fishing vessel indicted for clean water and ship pollution violations; defendants allegedly participated in and ordered the illegal discharge of bilge wastes over the course of several years   The owner and captain of the commercial F/V Native Sun


Austal Wins SCA Safety Awards

Terry O Brien accepts Austal SCA Safety Awards from Stephen Woodring and Tom Godfrey of SCA Photo Austal

Austal USA remains one of the safest shipyards in the country the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA) announced Mar. 7. Austal’s hard-earned workplace safety record has been recognized, yet again, by the SCA with both the 2015 Award for Excellence in Safety and the 2015 Award for






 
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