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Used Vessels

Stolt-Nielsen to Buy 3 Used Tanker Ships

The AP has reported that Stolt-Nielsen SA is buying three used tanker ships for about $40 million. The company said its wholly owned subsidiary, Stolt-Nielsen Transportation Group, has exercised an option to purchase the tankers, currently on charter, from Montana Ship Holding AS. According to Stolt-Nielsen, it chartered the ships in December 2001 with an option to buy at any time. The company said the three ships are to be converted at a cost of $7.5 million to meet new safety regulations that will take effect Jan. 1 next year. Stolt-Nielsen said it anticipates the ships will allow it take advantage of growth prospects for the parcel tanker market. It also said the used vessels will help it save money since the cost of shipbuilding is at historic highs. American depositary shares of Stolt-Nielsen fell 55 cents to $31.20 in afternoon trading on the Nasdaq.


McDermott Awarded Two Saudi Aramco Contracts

McDermott International, Inc subsidiary awarded two projects for Saudi Aramco in the Arabian Gulf in the Karan, Safaniya and Zuluf fields The first project, Karan-45, comprises fabrication of a new wellhead platform, auxiliary platform, jacket and link bridge, with subsea installation of a 20-inch flowline and a 15kV composite power and fiber optic cable. Project management, engineering and procurement will be undertaken at McDermott’s engineering office in Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia


Planned Tanker Age Curbs Seen As Insufficient

Age limits being imposed on tanker chartering by oil companies do not address the use of ships like the Erika, which broke up off France in December, shipping industry sources said. Companies are opting not to use large vessels, above either 80,000 or 100,000 dwt, more than 20 years old unless they have extra safety certificates. However, the age limit is higher for smaller tankers - at 25 years - partly because there are not enough newer ships


SCA: Tanker Rates Justify Higher Construction Prices

The vessel retirement schedule in the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 will force retirement over the next five years of at least 12 U.S.-flag product tankers totaling almost 500,000 dwt of capacity (approximately 25 percent of the total U.S.-flag product tanker fleet) and over 50 U.S.-flag tank barges greater than 5,000 gross tons totaling over 1,000,000 dwt of capacity (approximately 45 percent of the total U.S.-flag ocean-going tank barge fleet greater than 5,000 gross tons). The struggling


Obituary: David Parrot, Founder and Former Chief, TITAN Salvage

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David Gray Parrot, 65, founder and former chief of TITAN Salvage, passed away in Maine in the comfort of family and friends. Parrot is survived by his wife Penny, sons Hunter and Gage, and a network of friends and family.  A private family service is scheduled for this weekend in Maine. "On behalf of the entire Crowley organization, I extend my deepest sympathies and condolences to David's family, friends and colleagues," said Tom Crowley, Jr


Effectively Assessing Your Risks

One of the greatest challenges facing a lender in the maritime industry is appropriate assessment of risk. In this exciting, varied and vibrant industry, a lender's effective risk assessment requires a thorough understanding of the vagaries that characterize the industry. Many of the companies have been in business for 100 years or more. They have a long family history associated with the sea that has charted their economic destiny for decades.


Damen Trading Delivers Several Vessels

Photo: Damen

Trading in preowned vessels continues to be a popular choice for many customers. Damen Trading facilitates the sale and purchase of both Damen and third-party vessels. Recent deals highlight how trading in vessels results in a win-win situation for buyer and seller.  Under these arrangements vessels have been sold in Australia and bought by clients in Uruguay, U.K. vessels have gone to Zanzibar, Colombian vessels to Jamaica, with customers worldwide seeing the benefits of trading in


"We Need to Talk About the Jones Act ..."

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This is an open letter to the offshore oil and gas industry operating on the outer continental shelf. Dear Customer: We need to talk about the Jones Act and the other cabotage laws that require you to use U.S.-flag vessels to transport cargo and people from one part of to another.  You already know that, as the association that represents the owners and operators of flag workboats, we are willing to fight to protect the Jones Act


Wind Power Seen Surging as Custom Barges Cut Cost

Offshore wind-power producers from Dong Energy A/S to RWE AG are building custom ships at record rates to reduce the cost of the technology which is  three times as pricey as electricity from coal plants. As many as 20 vessels, some with movable legs which reach the seafloor, will come onto the market in the next few years, reducing chartering costs of as much as 200,000 euros ($261,000) a day, said Marc Seidel, an offshore engineer at Suzlon Energy Ltd


Bourbon Chooses Offshore Ship Designers

Offshore Ship Designers has been chosen to design a series of six new fuel-efficient seismic support/chase vessels ordered by French offshore major Bourbon to be built at Dubai’s Grandweld Shipyards. The 53 m vessels will have hybrid propulsion systems, slow speed escort and support work, and a high degree of maneuvrability. The vessels will be chartered by Bourbon to CGGVeritas with delivery of the first vessels set for the end of 2012


ClassNK Approves Niigata Dual-fuel Engine Design

Image: ClassNK

Classification society ClassNK has granted approval to the design of the new 28AHX-DF dual-fuel engine developed by Niigata Power Systems Co., Ltd. The new engine is slated to be used as the main engine on a new LNG-fuelled tugboat being built by Keihin Dock Co., Ltd. for NYK Line


From Security to Efficiency Modern Vessel Tracking

Nick Farrell

More so than many other fields of business, the maritime industry is focused on cost, which in turn gives the appearance of being conservative towards technology. Of course, we have magnificently technical ships operating with equipment that wouldn’t look out of place in a NASA lab


MSC Approves SOLAS Amendments

SOLAS amendments to make IGF Code mandatory approved by Maritime Safety Committee   The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), which met at the Organization's London headquarters for its 94th session, from November 17-21, 2014


Choosing the Best Financing Proposal

It isn’t always about the rate. In a robust boatbuilding market – like the one we see now – even the most successful, financially stable operators need to borrow. And, if that newbuild or conversion program involves a significant fleet expansion


Night Moves on America's Waterways

Overnight operations are certainly not unusual on America’s inland waterways, but that doesn’t make them any less hazardous. Onboard activities that seem so straightforward and customary in the light of day can take on a decidedly different feel after the sun sets and darkness


Glosten Designing Vigor’s Alaska Class Ferries

Glosten using Nupas-Cadmatic software for Vigor’s Alaska Class Ferry project   Seattle-based naval architecture consultancy Glosten has joined the list of North American companies utilizing Nupas-Cadmatic, a CAD/CAM engineering software system for the marine and offshore industry


Bollinger Delivers 11th FRC to the US Coast Guard

USCGC William Trump during builders trials in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

Bollinger Shipyards, Inc. has delivered the William Trump, the 11th Fast Response Cutter (FRC) to the United States Coast Guard.   The announcement was made by Bollinger Chief Operating Officer, Ben Bordelon: “We are extremely happy to announce the delivery of the latest FRC built by


How Difficult is it to Obtain a Jones Act Waiver?

The American Salvage Association’s Jon Waldron provides the ultimate cabotage primer. There always seems to be constant chatter about waiving the Jones Act. In reality, it is a simple task to demystify the thought that it is easy to obtain such waivers


World’s Largest Containership First Tested at MARIN

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MARIN was delighted to take part in a truly historic milestone in the industry when Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) asked MARIN to investigate the seakeeping ability of what would become the largest container vessel in the world - Maersk Line’s Triple-E.


ICS Addresses OECD Shipbuilding Working Party

The OECD should be cautious about becoming involved in the question of what constitutes an ‘eco-ship’, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) said to governments in Paris today at a meeting of the OECD Working Party on Shipbuilding.   


Is Glycerine the Next Marine Fuel?

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Following a year described as “intense activity,” the Glycerine Fuel for Marine Sustainability project (GLEAMS) concluded that Glycerine is a viable, exceptionally clean alternative marine fuel. The GLEAMS project claims that it has been particularly successful in dispelling the


Pile Testing for Wikinger Wind Farm Launched

Template recovery following successful piling

In October 2014 the first phase of the pile testing campaign for the Wikinger offshore wind farm project was launched after the site’s geotechnical investigation on the Baltic Sea had been completed.     German engineering and services group Bilfinger was awarded the test pile


Fire Departments Choose Sea-Fire Systems

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Metalcraft Marine's Firestorm high-speed, aluminum fireboat represents a new generation in vessel technology, especially when fitted with Sea-Fire H Series engineered fire suppression systems. Recently, four fire departments selected this combination.


Preparing for Low Sulphur Operation

Engine Room

Stricter limitations on sulphur emissions (SOx) will pose many challenges to ships operating in Emission Control Areas (ECAs). If not handled with care, switching from Heavy Fuel Oil to Marine Gas Oil can put equipment at risk and increase operational costs


Getting Real on LNG Fuel

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Plentiful supply, low prices and strict regulations on air pollution are fuelling a swift move towards using LNG as fuel for ship propulsion in the USA and Canada. In Europe strict regulation in port is pushing passenger ship owners to use LNG fuel while berthed.






 
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