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Carl Vinson Sailors to Test Shipboard Waste Disposal System

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Maja Dyson, USS Carl Vinson Public Affairs Fourteen USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Sailors returned from a 60-day trip to Montreal, Canada Aug. 30, where they tested, operated, maintained, and evaluated the Plasma Arc Waste Destruction System (PAWDS). PAWDS is a waste disposal tool currently being considered for shipboard use by the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA). The system has been under design and funded by the Navy for more than 12 years. The system can process approximately 6,800 pounds of typical Navy solid waste per day. Testing in Montreal was designed to successfully demonstrate the system's performance for an ongoing period of 60 days, in order to simulate a ship's partial deployment cycle. "Carl Vinson Sailors helped evaluate the PAWDS Engineering Development Model (EDM) with respect to performance, reliability, maintainability, human systems integration (HSI), safety, and manning requirements," said Chief Machinist's Mate Ola Lassley, who led the Carl Vinson test group to Montreal. Through its capacity to support the maritime industry, the Canadian based PyroGenesis company developed PAWDS, and has successfully demonstrated its performance on board commercial cruise lines. The company is now working with the Navy to explore the possibility of incorporating their systems on board Navy ships like USS Carl Vinson.


Two US Navy Jets Crash into The Pacific

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter from the Red Lions of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 15 lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during search and rescue operations for the pilot of one of two F/A-18 Hornets which crashed earlier in the day while operating from the ship. The other pilot was located and returned to Carl Vinson for medical care. (U.S. Navy photo by John Philip Wagner, Jr.)

The pilot of one of two F/A-18 Hornets that crashed Sept. 12 while operating from USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) is in fair condition and receiving medical treatment aboard the ship. Search efforts continue for the missing pilot. At the time of the incident, USS Carl Vinson was operating in the Western Pacific Ocean approximately 250 nautical miles west of Wake Island. The cause of the crash is under investigation. The ships of the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group, USS Carl Vinson


Northrop Grumman Wins USS Carl Vinson Contract

Northrop Grumman Corporation was awarded a planning contract from the U.S. Navy valued at approximately $42 million that will facilitate continued preparations for the overhaul and refueling of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson(CVN 70) scheduled for 2004. This contract is the first modification to one originally awarded in May 2001, bringing the total contract value to date to approximately $52 million


USS Carl Vinson Readies

Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) are conducting general quarters (GQ) drills this November after a three-year pause while the ship was undergoing its extensive mid-life overhaul at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. For Sailors who have served aboard Vinson during its tenure in the shipyard, the implementation of GQ drills signals an imminent return of the aircraft carrier to operational status.


Newport News Shipbuilding Awarded Contract

Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Va., is being awarded a $143,103,367 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification for FY03 advanced planning and material procurement for the refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) of the USS Carl Vinson. Work will be performed at Newport News (97 percent) and Puget Sound, Wash. (3 percent), and is to be completed by November 2003. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current


Stennis 'Looks Ahead' to New Home in Washington

By Journalist 2nd Class Victoria Tobin, Public Affairs Center San Diego USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) departed San Diego Jan. 5th for its new homeport in the Pacific Northwest. The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier is making the trip up the west coast to Bremerton, Wash. Shortly after arriving, the ship is scheduled for routine maintenance and technology upgrades for most of 2005 before its next scheduled deployment.


New PACFLT Commander Addresses Goals for Pacific AOR

Commander Pacific Fleet Adm. Robert Willard discussed the Navy’s evolving maritime strategy and the shift of emphasis from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet during a breakfast meeting in San Diego on June 21. During the morning address to local military and civilian leaders, Willard discussed the changing approach of the U.S. Navy in regard to its maritime strategy. The strategy is one that strikes a balance between what he called “high-end warfare” and “low-end warfare” that is


USS Carl Vinson Completes Sea Trials

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This Day in Naval History – Feb. 20

1815 - USS Constitution, under Captain Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant 1962 – Lt. Col. John Glenn, USMC becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) consisted of 3 orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph with the highest altitude of 162.2 statute miles. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD-841). 1962 - USS Dixie (AD-14) rescues lone crewman aboard a sailing yawl adrift for four days.


USS The Sullivans Celebrates its 10th Anniversary

The crew of USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) with USS The Sullivans Foundation and the people of Staten Island celebrated the 10th anniversary of the ship’s commissioning June 16 at the pier where the ship was commissioned. The USS The Sullivans Foundation, a non-profit organization established to support the crew and ship, hosted the ceremony and following reception as a way to strengthen the tie between the people of Staten Island and the crew and ship.


This Day In Naval History: June 29

1860 - The steamer USS Mystic, commanded by William E. LeRoy, captures the slaver, Thomas Achorn at Kabenda, Africa and send her to New York.    1862 - During the Civil War, the steam sloop USS Susquehanna, commanded by Cmdr. R.B


Fundraiser Held for USS Gerald R. Ford Crew

Photo: Blackmer

Blackmer, a company in positive displacement and centrifugal pump and reciprocating compressor technologies, has a relationship with the U.S. Military that dates back to 1914 when it became an official equipment supplier to the Armed Forces.  


This Day In Naval History: June 28

William M. Wood (Photo: U.S. Navy)

1776 - Army Col. William Moultries' troops defend Sullivans Island and Charleston, S.C. from an attack by British Commodore Sir Peter Parker and his fleet during the American Revolution. After a nine-hour battle with casualties mounting, Parker retreats


This Day In Naval History: June 24

1833 - The frigate Constitution is the first vessel to enter the newly-built dry dock at the Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. for overhaul. A false rumor circulates in Boston in 1830 that the U.S. Navy intends to scrap the ship; young Oliver Wendell Holmes pens his poem "Old


This Day In Naval History: June 23

1812 - During the War of 1812, Commodore John Rodgers leads a squadron onboard USS President off New York until she battles HMS Belvidera. The first shot of the War of 1812 is fired by USS President during this engagement.   1861 - During the Civil War


This Day In Naval History: June 22

Flasher (SSN-613) (left) and Tecumseh (SSBN-628) are seen on the building ways at General Dynamics Electric Boat on 21 June 1963. They would be launched simultaneously on the following day. (Photo courtesy of Valllejo Naval and Historical Museum)

1807 - Frigate USS Chesapeake, commanded by James Barron, is stopped by British frigate HMS Leopard after killing several of her crew and take Royal Navy deserters. Barron is court-martialed for not having his ship prepared to fight.  


This Day In Naval History: June 21

1898 - During the Spanish-American War, the cruiser USS Charleston captures the island of Guam without resistance from Spain, because the Spanish Navy had no sufficient ammunition for defense.   1919 - The German navy scuttles its own fleet at Scapa Flow. After the Nov


This Day In Naval History: June 17

USS Delaware entering the first drydock in America at Gosport Navy Yard (Norfolk), June 17, 1833. (Courtesy Tommy Trampp, NavSource)

1815 - Commodore Stephen Decatur's squadron engages the Algerian flagship Mashouda near Cape de Gatt, Spain. Though the Algerian frigate maneuvers actively to escape, she surrenders after 20 men, including her commander, are killed.  


This Day in Naval History: June 16

USS Monterey (CG 61) (U.S. Navy photo by Christian Eskelund)

1943 - At Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, Japanese aircraft conduct the largest raid since April 7. Although a large number of enemy planes are shot down, LST-340 and USS Celeno (AK-76) are damaged. 1944 - Marine Gunnery Sgt. Robert H. McCard serves as a platoon sergeant with Company A


US Navy to Name Attack Submarine USS Arkansas

Image: U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist

 A Virginia-class attack submarine will be called the USS Arkansas, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced.   Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced that SSN 800, a Virginia-class attack submarine, will bear the name USS Arkansas.  


US Navy Stealth Destroyer Showcases Furuno Technology

USS Zumwalt  (Photo: Furuno)

The U.S. Navy recently launched USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), lead ship of the all-new Zumwalt-class of stealth destroyers. Named for Admiral Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt, this new vessel was developed under the US Navy’s DD-21 “21st Century Destroyer” program.  


This Day In Naval History - June 15

USS Mars (AFS 1) (U.S. Navy photo)

1775 - Abraham Whipple takes command of Rhode Island's coastal defense ship, Katy, and captures a tender of HMS Rose. In December, Katy is taken into the Continental service and renamed Providence.   1864 - During the Civil War, the side-wheel steamer, USS Lexington, commanded by Lt


Containership Outperforms Environmental Standards

MV Carl Schulte (Photo: BSM)

A state-of-the-art containership designed by the Schulte Group to meet the most stringent international environmental standards is already outperforming in terms of design and performance and attracting positive attention in the industry.


This Day In Naval History: June 13

Sketch by LCDR. DeLong of Jeannette stuck and sinking in the ice in June 1881. US Navy image

1881 - The bark-rigged wooden steamship Jeannette sinks after she is crushed in an Arctic ice pack during the expedition to reach the North Pole through the Bering Strait. Only 13 of her crew survive out of 33.   1900 - During the Boxer Rebellion


This Day In Naval History: June 10

USS Firebolt (PC 10) (U.S. Navy photo by Randall Damm)

1854 - The first formal graduation exercises are held at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. Previous classes graduated without a ceremony. Rear Adm. Thomas O. Selfridge and Rear Adm. Joseph N. Miller are two of the six graduates that year.






 
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