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Uss Forrestal

This Day in Naval History – Dec 11

1941 - Contract establishes the Naval Salvage Service. 1941 - Wake Island Garrison under Commander Winfield Cunningham repulses Japanese invasion force. 1954 - First supercarrier of 59,630 tons, USS Forrestal (CVA-59), launched at Newport News, VA. (Source: Navy News Service)


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 30

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) preparing to leave Tinian after delivering atomic bomb components, circa July 26, 1945. She was sunk on July 30 while en route to the Philippines. (Donation of Major Harley G. Toomey, Jr., USAF(Retired), 1971, who took this photograph. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 30 1918 - Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France 1941 - Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China; First Navy ship damaged by Axis during World War II. 1942 - Franklin D. Roosevelt signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, more than 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES.


This Day in Naval History – Oct. 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his


This Day in Naval History: July 14

On July 14, 1813, LT John M. Gamble became the first marine to command a ship in battle. Forty years later, Commodore Matthew Perry held his first meeting with the Japanese in Uraga, Japan, and would go on to establish economic tries between the US and Asia. In 1882, sailors and marines from four U.S. ships landed in Alexandria, Egypt, and helped restore order. U.S. warships bombarded Kamaishi, Japan, on this day in 1945; and in 1950, U.S


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 14

USS Forrestal (CVA-59). Photographed by W.F. Radcliff, 1955. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 14 1813 - Lt. John M. Gamble, the first marine to command a ship in battle (prize vessel Greenwich in capture of British whaler Seringapatam) 1853 - Commodore Matthew Perry lands and holds first meeting with Japanese at Uraga, Japan 1882 - Sailors and Marines from four U.S. ships land to help restore order at Alexandria, Egypt. 1945 - U.S. warships bombard Kamaishi, Japan; first naval gunfire bombardment of Japanese Home Islands.


Special Pilotage in Port of Brownsville

It was no ordinary arrival for the Brazos-Santiago Pilots of Brownsville, Texas    The Brazos-Santiago Pilots handle some 600 ship and vessel transits through the Port of Brownsville each year, but it's not every day that they get the opportunity to guide a venerable and storied U.S. Navy carrier to its final destination.    "It's an especially proud honor to be a part of history and to pilot the USS Ranger on the final 15-mile leg of its 16


This Day in Navy History

October 1, 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878


This Day in Naval History - Oct. 01

From the Navy News Service 1800 - schooner Experiment captures French schooner Diana. 1844 - The Naval Observatory, headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury, occupies its first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser Lt. J.Q. Barton is given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a pay department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until Oct. 1, 1877, when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy.


This Day in Naval History – October 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his


Today in U.S. Naval History: October 1

USS Independence (CV-62). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Today in U.S. Naval History - October 1 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until October 1, 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy


This Day In Naval History - May 24

1917 - The first U.S. convoy left Hampton Roads, Va. to cross the North Atlantic after entering World War I. During the 18 months of war while American vessels escort convoys through the war zone, 183 attacks are made by submarines, 24 submarines are damaged and two are destroyed.  


Mount Whitney Makes History

Photo USN

USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), the U.S. 6th Fleet flagship, made history today as the first amphibious command ship to have an MV-22B Osprey land on its flight deck, May 23, 2016. The MV-22B and crew are part of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 (VMM-263), “The Thunder Chickens


Fleet Week Underway in New York

Photo: Jeff OMalley

Parade of ships signals start of Fleet Week New York 2016   Now in its 28th year, New York Fleet Week has commenced, with ships from the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy sailing into New York Harbor.   The parade of ships


This Day In Naval History: May 26

1943 - USS Saury (SS 189) attacks a Japanese convoy south of Kyushu and sinks transport Kagi Maru, about 10 miles north of the Nansei Shoto. Also on this date, USS Whale (SS 239) sinks Japanese gunboat Shoei Maru (which is transporting men of the Guam Base Detachment) about 17 miles


US Navy Asks Lockheed to Fix Littoral Combat Ships Issues

U.S. Navy photo by Timothy Schumaker

The U.S. Navy has sent Lockheed Martin Corp three requests to correct problems, including propulsion-related issues, with the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program dating back to May of last year, a Navy spokesman said on Tuesday.   The ships were originally designed as a small


This Day In Naval History - May 11

1862 - CSS Virginia is destroyed by Confederates off Craney Island to prevent capture.   1898 - During the Spanish-American War, Marines and Sailors from USS Marblehead (C 11) and USS Nashville (PG 7) cut the trans-oceanic cable near Cienfuegos, Cuba, isolating Cuba from Spain


This Day In Naval History: May 12

USS Enterprise (CV-6) (Photo: US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum)

1780 - The city of Charleston, S.C., falls to the British when Continental Gen. Benjamin Lincoln surrenders during the American Revolution. Three Continental Navy frigates (Boston, Providence, and Ranger) are captured; and one American frigate (Queen of France) is sunk to prevent capture.


This Day In Naval History: May 13

USS Enterprise (CVAN 65) (bottom), USS Long Beach (CGN 9) (center) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25) (top) in 1964 (U.S. Navy photo)

1846 - Congress declares war against Mexico. Commodore David Conner is responsible for the landing of the Army at Vera Cruz. In April 1847, Commodore Matthew C. Perry relieves Conner. On Feb. 2, 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo is signed ending hostilities.  


This Day In Naval History: May 16

USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) (U.S. Navy photo)

1811 - The frigate President, commanded by John Rodgers, exchanges several shots with HMS Little Belt during the night. Each captain claims the other fired first, increasing tensions between the two countries prior to the War of 1812. 1820 - The frigate Congress becomes the first U.S


This Day In Naval History: May 17

USS Roark (FF-1053). U.S. Navy photo by PHAN Burgess

1942 - USS Tautog (SS 199) sinks Japanese submarine I-28; USS Triton (SS 201) sinks the Japanese submarine (I 64), and USS Skipjack (SS 184) sinks a Japanese army transport ship.   1943 - Destroyers USS Moffett (DD 362) and USS Jouett (DD 396) sink German submarine U 128


This Day In Naval History: May 18

Apollo 10 launching (Photo: NASA)

1775 - Col. Benedict Arnold captures a British sloop at St. Johns in Quebec, Canada and renames her Enterprise, the first of many famous ships with that name. 1898 - During the Spanish-American War, boat parties from USS St. Louis and USS Wompatuck, under Capt. Caspar F


This Day In Naval History: May 19

1813 - During the War of 1812, the frigate Congress, commanded by John Smith, captures and burns the British merchant brig, Jean, in the Atlantic.   1855 - The screw ship Powhatan lands her Marine guard at Shanghai, China, to protect the lives and property of Americans during a period of


This Day In Naval History - May 20

USS Russell (DDG 59) (U.S. Navy photo by Melinda Larson)

1815 - Commodore Stephen Decatur sails with his flagship USS Guerriere and a squadron of nine ships for the Mediterranean to suppress piracy. Under strict negotiations, Decatur is able to secure a treaty with the Day of Algiers, His Highness Omar Bashaw, on July 3.


This Day In Naval History: May 23

Members from the guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain (CG 57) tow a disabled skiff carrying 52 Somali migrants. (U.S. Navy photo by Daniel Barker)

1850 - USS Advance and USS Rescue sail from New York in a failed attempt to rescue Sir John Franklins Expedition, lost in the Arctic since 1847. Caught in the ice and after tremendous hardship, USS Advance returns on Aug. 20, 1851. Rescue returns Sept. 7.  


HII Secures Aircraft Carrier Planning Contract

Rendering of the third ship in the Ford class of aircraft carriers, Enterprise (CVN 80) (Image: HII)

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) was awarded a $152 million contract for advance planning for the construction of the third aircraft carrier in the Gerald R. Ford class, Enterprise (CVN 80), named in honor of the U.S. Navy’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN 65)






 
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