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Uss Forrestal

This Day in Naval History – Dec 11

1941 - Contract establishes the Naval Salvage Service. 1941 - Wake Island Garrison under Commander Winfield Cunningham repulses Japanese invasion force. 1954 - First supercarrier of 59,630 tons, USS Forrestal (CVA-59), launched at Newport News, VA. (Source: Navy News Service)


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 30

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) preparing to leave Tinian after delivering atomic bomb components, circa July 26, 1945. She was sunk on July 30 while en route to the Philippines. (Donation of Major Harley G. Toomey, Jr., USAF(Retired), 1971, who took this photograph. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 30 1918 - Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France 1941 - Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China; First Navy ship damaged by Axis during World War II. 1942 - Franklin D. Roosevelt signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, more than 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES.


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 14

USS Forrestal (CVA-59). Photographed by W.F. Radcliff, 1955. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 14 1813 - Lt. John M. Gamble, the first marine to command a ship in battle (prize vessel Greenwich in capture of British whaler Seringapatam) 1853 - Commodore Matthew Perry lands and holds first meeting with Japanese at Uraga, Japan 1882 - Sailors and Marines from four U.S. ships land to help restore order at Alexandria, Egypt. 1945 - U.S. warships bombard Kamaishi, Japan; first naval gunfire bombardment of Japanese Home Islands.


This Day in Naval History: July 14

On July 14, 1813, LT John M. Gamble became the first marine to command a ship in battle. Forty years later, Commodore Matthew Perry held his first meeting with the Japanese in Uraga, Japan, and would go on to establish economic tries between the US and Asia. In 1882, sailors and marines from four U.S. ships landed in Alexandria, Egypt, and helped restore order. U.S. warships bombarded Kamaishi, Japan, on this day in 1945; and in 1950, U.S


Special Pilotage in Port of Brownsville

It was no ordinary arrival for the Brazos-Santiago Pilots of Brownsville, Texas    The Brazos-Santiago Pilots handle some 600 ship and vessel transits through the Port of Brownsville each year, but it's not every day that they get the opportunity to guide a venerable and storied U.S. Navy carrier to its final destination.    "It's an especially proud honor to be a part of history and to pilot the USS Ranger on the final 15-mile leg of its 16


Today in U.S. Naval History: October 1

USS Independence (CV-62). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Today in U.S. Naval History - October 1 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until October 1, 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy


This Day in Naval History – October 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his


This Day in Navy History

October 1, 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878


This Day in Naval History – Oct. 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his


This Day in Naval History - Oct. 01

From the Navy News Service 1800 - schooner Experiment captures French schooner Diana. 1844 - The Naval Observatory, headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury, occupies its first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser Lt. J.Q. Barton is given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a pay department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until Oct. 1, 1877, when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy.


Future LCS Charleston’s Keel Authenticated

Official U.S. Navy file photo.

A ceremony was hosted to celebrate the keel authentication of the U.S. Navy's future USS Charleston (LCS 18), the ninth Independence variant littoral combat ship, June 28.   Charlotte Riley, wife of former Charleston mayor Joseph Riley


This Day In Naval History: June 29

1860 - The steamer USS Mystic, commanded by William E. LeRoy, captures the slaver, Thomas Achorn at Kabenda, Africa and send her to New York.    1862 - During the Civil War, the steam sloop USS Susquehanna, commanded by Cmdr. R.B


Fundraiser Held for USS Gerald R. Ford Crew

Photo: Blackmer

Blackmer, a company in positive displacement and centrifugal pump and reciprocating compressor technologies, has a relationship with the U.S. Military that dates back to 1914 when it became an official equipment supplier to the Armed Forces.  


Russia, US Blame Each Other for Maritime Incident

Russia and the United States gave contradictory accounts on Tuesday of an incident involving the two countries' navies in the Mediterranean Sea on June 17, each blaming the other for what they said were unsafe manoeuvres.   The Russian Defence Ministry said a U.S


This Day In Naval History: June 28

William M. Wood (Photo: U.S. Navy)

1776 - Army Col. William Moultries' troops defend Sullivans Island and Charleston, S.C. from an attack by British Commodore Sir Peter Parker and his fleet during the American Revolution. After a nine-hour battle with casualties mounting, Parker retreats


This Day In Naval History: June 27

1861 - While commanding a gunboat flotilla, Cmdr. James Harmon Ward is mortally wounded by a musket ball while aiming the bow gun of his flagship, USS Thomas Freeborn at Mathias Point, Va. Ward is the first US Naval officer casualty of the Civil War.   


US Navy Accepts Delivery of Future USS Montgomery

Official U.S. Navy file photo of Independence variant littoral combat ship

The U.S. Navy has accepted delivery of future USS Montgomery (LCS 8) during a ceremony on June 23 at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Ala.   Marking the official transfer of Montgomery from the shipbuilder to the Navy, delivery is the final milestone prior to commissioning


This Day In Naval History: June 24

1833 - The frigate Constitution is the first vessel to enter the newly-built dry dock at the Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. for overhaul. A false rumor circulates in Boston in 1830 that the U.S. Navy intends to scrap the ship; young Oliver Wendell Holmes pens his poem "Old


Admiral of the Ocean Sea Award Recipients Named

Clockwise (from top left) Arthur E. Imperatore, Christopher Wiernicki, and Donald Marcus, Photo USS

The United Seamen's Service (USS) 2016 Admiral of the Ocean Sea Awards (AOTOS) will be presented to Arthur E. Imperatore, Founder and President of New York Waterways; Donald Marcus, President of the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots; and Christopher Wiernicki


This Day In Naval History: June 23

1812 - During the War of 1812, Commodore John Rodgers leads a squadron onboard USS President off New York until she battles HMS Belvidera. The first shot of the War of 1812 is fired by USS President during this engagement.   1861 - During the Civil War


This Day In Naval History: June 22

Flasher (SSN-613) (left) and Tecumseh (SSBN-628) are seen on the building ways at General Dynamics Electric Boat on 21 June 1963. They would be launched simultaneously on the following day. (Photo courtesy of Valllejo Naval and Historical Museum)

1807 - Frigate USS Chesapeake, commanded by James Barron, is stopped by British frigate HMS Leopard after killing several of her crew and take Royal Navy deserters. Barron is court-martialed for not having his ship prepared to fight.  


This Day In Naval History: June 21

1898 - During the Spanish-American War, the cruiser USS Charleston captures the island of Guam without resistance from Spain, because the Spanish Navy had no sufficient ammunition for defense.   1919 - The German navy scuttles its own fleet at Scapa Flow. After the Nov


US Aircraft Carrier Docks in Crete After Islamic State Battles

USS Harry S. Truman  (Photo: U.S. Navy)

The USS Harry S. Truman aircraft carrier arrived in Crete on Tuesday, giving its 5,500 crew members a Greek island break after seven months at sea and over 2,000 missions launched against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria.   The U.S


This Day In Naval History: June 17

USS Delaware entering the first drydock in America at Gosport Navy Yard (Norfolk), June 17, 1833. (Courtesy Tommy Trampp, NavSource)

1815 - Commodore Stephen Decatur's squadron engages the Algerian flagship Mashouda near Cape de Gatt, Spain. Though the Algerian frigate maneuvers actively to escape, she surrenders after 20 men, including her commander, are killed.  


US Navy Warship Undergoes Shock Trials

Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship USS Jackson (LCS 6) has completed the first of three scheduled full-ship shock trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Michael Bevan)

The U.S. Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship USS Jackson (LCS 6) completes shock trials; Austal USA receives LCS contract modification for 'Sea Giraffe' Radar   The Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program continues to progress, with the U.S






 
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