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Uss Forrestal

This Day in Naval History – Dec 11

1941 - Contract establishes the Naval Salvage Service. 1941 - Wake Island Garrison under Commander Winfield Cunningham repulses Japanese invasion force. 1954 - First supercarrier of 59,630 tons, USS Forrestal (CVA-59), launched at Newport News, VA. (Source: Navy News Service)


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 30

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) preparing to leave Tinian after delivering atomic bomb components, circa July 26, 1945. She was sunk on July 30 while en route to the Philippines. (Donation of Major Harley G. Toomey, Jr., USAF(Retired), 1971, who took this photograph. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 30 1918 - Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France 1941 - Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China; First Navy ship damaged by Axis during World War II. 1942 - Franklin D. Roosevelt signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, more than 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES.


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 14

USS Forrestal (CVA-59). Photographed by W.F. Radcliff, 1955. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 14 1813 - Lt. John M. Gamble, the first marine to command a ship in battle (prize vessel Greenwich in capture of British whaler Seringapatam) 1853 - Commodore Matthew Perry lands and holds first meeting with Japanese at Uraga, Japan 1882 - Sailors and Marines from four U.S. ships land to help restore order at Alexandria, Egypt. 1945 - U.S. warships bombard Kamaishi, Japan; first naval gunfire bombardment of Japanese Home Islands.


This Day in Naval History: July 14

On July 14, 1813, LT John M. Gamble became the first marine to command a ship in battle. Forty years later, Commodore Matthew Perry held his first meeting with the Japanese in Uraga, Japan, and would go on to establish economic tries between the US and Asia. In 1882, sailors and marines from four U.S. ships landed in Alexandria, Egypt, and helped restore order. U.S. warships bombarded Kamaishi, Japan, on this day in 1945; and in 1950, U.S


This Day In Naval History - July 29

Maine (SSBN-741) Commissioning Program signed by the SECNAV. (Courtesy of Chester O. Morris)

1846 - During the Mexican-American War, a detachment of Marines and Sailors, led by Arm. Col. John C. Fremont from the sloop USS Cyane, commanded by Cmdr. Samuel F. DuPont, lands and takes possession of San Diego and raises the U.S. flag.   1898 - During the Spanish-American War, the gunboat, USS Helena, commanded by Cmdr. William T. Swinburne, captures the Spanish steamer Manati at Cienfuegos, Cuba.   1920 - USS St


Special Pilotage in Port of Brownsville

It was no ordinary arrival for the Brazos-Santiago Pilots of Brownsville, Texas    The Brazos-Santiago Pilots handle some 600 ship and vessel transits through the Port of Brownsville each year, but it's not every day that they get the opportunity to guide a venerable and storied U.S. Navy carrier to its final destination.    "It's an especially proud honor to be a part of history and to pilot the USS Ranger on the final 15-mile leg of its 16


Today in U.S. Naval History: October 1

USS Independence (CV-62). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Today in U.S. Naval History - October 1 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until October 1, 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy


This Day in Naval History – October 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his


This Day in Navy History

October 1, 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878


This Day in Naval History – Oct. 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his


Navy Christens Littoral Combat Ship Wichita

Logo

The Navy will christen its newest Freedom-variant littoral combat ship, USS Wichita (LCS 13), during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony Saturday, Sept. 17 in Marinette, Wisconsin. Wichita, designated LCS 13, honors the city of Wichita, Kansas. Sen


This Day In Naval History: September 16

1814 - A squadron from the schooner USS Carolina attacks and raids the base of the pirate Jean Lafitte, at Barataria, La., capturing six schooners and other small craft while the pirates flee the attack.   1823 - Samuel Southard becomes the seventh Secretary of the Navy


This Day In Naval History: September 15

USNS Choctaw County (Photo: U.S. Navy)

1942 - USS Wasp (CV 7) is torpedoed by a Japanese submarine while operating in the Southwestern Pacific in support of forces on Guadalcanal. USS O'Brien (DD 415) and USS North Carolina (BB 55) are also struck by torpedoes from the same submarine.  


US Navy Aids Ailing Cargo Ship Crewman

The U.S. Navy’s amphibious transport dock USS San Antonio (LPD 17) provided medical assistance to a crew member of a cargo vessel after receiving a distress call September 12.   After receiving the call at 5:32 p.m., the ship's medical team boarded the Liberian-flagged motor vessel


This Day In Naval History: September 14

1814 - During the War of 1812, the sloop-of-war, Wasp captures and burns the British merchant brig, HMS Bacchus, in the Atlantic. A week later, she captures the brig, Atlanta.   1899 - During the Philippine Insurrection Campaign, the gunboat, USS Concord, and the monitor, USS Monterey


This Day In Naval History: September 13

Christening Ceremony of the Cheyenne (SSN-773) (Photo by Jim Hemeon, courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat)

1803 - Commodore John Barry dies at Philadelphia, Pa., having served in numerous commands and over vessels in the Continental Navy during the American Revolution and in the newly formed U.S. Navy.    1814 - During the War of 1812


This Day In Naval History: September 7

Sailors assigned to attack submarine Minnesota (SSN-783) man the rails after the order to bring the ship to life is given during the commissioning ceremony for Minnesota.  (U.S. Navy photos by Andrew Schneide)

1775 - During the American Revolution, the British supply ship Unity is taken by the Continental schooner, Hannah, paid for by Army Gen. George Washington. It is the first prize taken by a Continental vessel.   1776 - David Bushnells submarine Turtle is used by Sgt


US Navy Ship Changes Course after Iran Vessel Interaction

USS Firebolt  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Walter M. Wayman)

A vessel from Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps came within 100 yards of a U.S. military ship in the central Gulf on Sept. 4, two U.S. Defense Department officials told Reuters on Tuesday.   The officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity


This Day In Naval History: September 6

Poster courtesy of Lockheed Martin

1861 - USS Tyler and USS Lexington, support Gen. Ulysses S. Grants Army operations against strategic Paducah and Smithland, Ky. The ships mobile firepower assists in the capture of the cities, helping to preserve Kentucky in the Union. 1918 - In the first use of major-caliber naval guns in a


This Day In Naval History: September 2

USS Sentry (MCM 3) (U.S. Navy photo by Johnny Bivera)

1777 - The frigate, USS Raleigh, commanded by Thomas Thompson, captures the British brig, HMS Nancy, while en route to France to purchase military stores.   1864 - During the Civil War, the 8-gun paddle-wheeler, USS Naiad, engages a Confederate battery at Rowes Landing, La., and silences it


This Day In Naval History: September 1

1800 - During the Quasi-War with France, the schooner, USS Experiment, commanded by Lt. Charles Stewart, captures the French privateer Deux Amix off Barbuda, West Indies.   1814 - The sloop-of-war, USS Wasp, commanded by Johnston Blakely, sinks the British brig sloop, HMS Avon


This Day In Naval History: August 31

Utah (BB-31) at Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Photo: Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

1842 - Congress replaces the Board of Navy Commissioners, a group of senior officers who oversee naval technical affairs, with the five technical Bureaus, ancestors of the Systems Commands. One of the 1842 Bureaus, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, continues to serve under its original name.


This Day In Naval History: August 30

USS Colorado (BB 45) (Photo: USNHC, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center)

1923 - USS Colorado (BB 45) is commissioned. Notable during her pre-World War II service, she helps in the search for missing aviator, Amelia Earhart, in 1937. During WWII, USS Colorado serves in the Pacific during World War II and is hit by kamikazes at Leyte in November 1944.  


This Day In Naval History: August 29

USS Decatur (DDG 73) (U.S. Navy photo)

1861 - During the Civil War, Seaman Benjamin Swearer lands with troops from the steam sloop of war, Pawnee, and takes part in the capture of Fort Clark, at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. He serves throughout the action and has the honor of being the first man to raise the flag on the captured fort


USS Freedom Suffers Casualty

USS Freedom (LCS 1) (Photo: U.S. Navy)

The U.S. Navy's first littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) experienced a casualty to one of its main propulsion diesel engines (MPDE) on July 11 reportedly caused by a leak from the attached seawater pump mechanical seal that resulted in seawater entering the engine lube oil system






 
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