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Uss Iowa

USS IOWA Prepares for Final Transit

USS IOWA Mast vertical(sm).jpg

USS IOWA Takes on Iowa Coins, Regains its Mast, Prepares for its Final Journey; The Battleship of Presidents will open as an interactive naval museum in Los Angeles.   The time-honored tradition of adding coins to the mast of a ship for good luck took place as two Iowans stood atop a 205-foot-tall platform and dropped Iowa state quarters into the mast of the USS IOWA as it hung from a barge crane. Former Iowa legislator Jeff Lamberti of Ankeny and Becky Beach of Des Moines released a handful of coins into the mast shortly before eight welders reattached it to the historic battleship. Lamberti and Beach have played key roles in the effort to save the USS IOWA and transform the historic ship into an interactive naval museum.   The mast, which is 50 feet tall and weighs 52,000 pounds, had to be reattached because the Navy had removed it more than 10 years ago so the ship would fit under bridges along its tow route. The Pacific Battleship Center, the nonprofit group bringing the USS IOWA back to life, has been refurbishing the ship to prepare for its move to the Port of Los Angeles Berth 87. This process includes the re-stepping of the original mast, a time-honored ritual in the maritime world that is thought to have originated in ancient Rome.   One theory is that the Romans placed coins under the mast so the crew would have the funds needed to pay to cross the River Styx to the afterlife if the ship were sunk


This Day in Naval History - May 25

From Navy News Service 1952 - USS Iowa (BB 61) bombards Chongjin, Korea. 1973 - Launch of Skylab 2 mission, which was first U.S. manned orbiting space station. It had an all Navy crew of Capt. Charles Conrad Jr. (commanding), Cmdr. Joseph P. Kerwin, and Cmdr. Paul J. Weitz.


Cold Spell Halts Mississippi River Barge Traffic

Barge traffic on the upper and mid-Mississippi River was slowing this week as a cold snap in the U.S. Midwest created ice on the Mississippi at Guttenberg, Iowa, and northward, shipping officials said on Wednesday. "It's very likely the last tow to move through Lock and Dam Number 10 near Guttenberg will be Thursday because of a build-up of ice," said a U.S. Army Corps official. A tow consisting of six barges was moving south from Clayton, Iowa


Managerial Appointments at MOL (America)

MOL (America) Inc. announced the appointment of Mr. Thomas Smart to the position of Midwest Regional Import Sales Manager, and the promotion of Mr. Larry Flading to the position of Midwest Regional Export Sales Manager. Mr. Smart assumes his new position having served as MOL (America) Inc.’s Midwest Regional Export Sales Manager since joining MOL in September 2002. Mr. Smart, who brings two decades of industry knowledge and experience to his new position


Navy Names Five New Ships

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today the next five Navy ships; three Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyers, the USS John Finn, the USS Ralph Johnson, and the USS Rafael Peralta, and two littoral combat ships (LCS), the USS Sioux City and the USS Omaha. Mabus named the three destroyers after Navy and Marine Corps heroes whose actions occurred during different conflicts which spanned several decades, but were united in their uncommon valor


Battleship on Voyage to New Home

USS Iowa: Photo credit Naval Historical Foundation

Transferred to ownership of the Pacific Battleship Center, historic battleshilp USS Iowa sails for preservation in new homeport Following years of aging in the San Francisco Bay area’s ghost fleet, the 887-foot long ship that once carried President Franklin Roosevelt to a World War II summit to meet with Churchill, Stalin and Chiang Kai Shek is coming to life once again as it is being prepared for what is most likely its final voyage.


Navy Scores a Hit on Non-Functioning Satellite

As a single modified tactical Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) launches from the U.S. Navy AEGIS cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70), successfully impacting a non-functioning National Reconnaissance Office satellite approximately 247 kilometers (133 nautical miles) over the Pacific Ocean, as it traveled in space at more than 17,000 mph. President George W. Bush decided to bring down the satellite because of the likelihood that the satellite could release hydrazine fuel upon impact


New Navy Contracts

Austal USA, Mobile Ala., was awarded a $99,557,548 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-08-C-2217) on Jun. 17, 2009, for long lead time material (LLTM) for Ships 2 and 3 of the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program.  This contract provides LLTM for main propulsion engines, aluminum, waterjets, reduction gears, generators, and other components to support construction of JHSV Ships 2 and 3, commencing in June 2010


Food Aid Creates Revenue for Maritime & Other Industries

The United States' principal international food aid program, Food for Peace, helped create and sustain 866 jobs which resulted in $37m in earnings in the state of Louisiana in 2009. By delivering food aid to foreign countries, the maritime industry employs 11,500 in deep sea freight transportation and sustains more than 97,000 jobs in other parts of the U.S. economy, in occupations dealing with the handling, processing and transporting of commodities from farmers to U.S


U.S. Army Corps to Close Upper Mississippi As Waters Rise

Storm system

  Rising flood waters were expected to make 11 locks and dams impassable on the mid- and upper-Mississippi River and force the closure of the river later on Monday from Bellevue, Iowa, to Saverton, Missouri, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said. The closure would be the most extensive since 2008 on that stretch of the country's busiest waterway, said Ron Fournier, public affairs officer for the Army Corps' Rock Island district


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 10

USS Houston (CA-30) with President Franklin D. Roosevelt on board. She is flying an admirals four-star flag at her foremast peak, and the Presidential flag at her mainmast peak. (U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 10 1934 - USS Houston takes Franklin Delano Roosevelt on first visit of U.S. President to South America. 1943 - Naval gunfire help Allied troops land on Sicily. It was first extensive use of LST's and smaller landing craft to deliver heavy equipment over


GLDD, BAE, Awarded DoD Contracts

Dredging Work off New York: File photo

U.S. Department of Defense informs that a New York Harbor dredging contract has been awarded to Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company (GLDD) and a Navy USS Jacinto drydocking contract to BAE Systems Norfolk Ship Repair. Details as follows: 1. Dredging contract


Vigor Awarded USS Emory S. Land Drydock Contract

 USS Emory S. Land (AS 39): Photo in public domain

The U.S. Department of Defense informs that Vigor Industrial, LLC, of Portland, Oregon, is being awarded a $16,984,940 firm-fixed-price contract for a 120-calendar day regular overhaul and dry docking of USS Emory S. Land (AS 39). Work will include No. 1 and No


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 23

The watch crew in the control room of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) maintain exact course and depth while the ship is passing under the polar ice gap. U.S. Navy Photo.

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 23 1947 - First Navy all jet squadron (VF-17A) receives its first aircraft (FH). 1948 - USS Putnum (DD-757) evacuates U.N. team from Haifa, Israel and becomes first U.S. Navy ship to fly the U.N. flag.


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 19

USS Kearsarge vs. CSS Alabama. Painting by Xanthus Smith, 1922, depicting Alabama sinking, at left, after her fight with the Kearsarge (seen at right). (Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York. Official U.S. Navy Photograph.)

Today in U.S. Naval History - June 19 1864 - USS Kearsarge sinks Confederate raider Alabama off France 1944 - Battle of the Philippine Sea begins ("The Marianas Turkey Shoot") 1948 - Chief of Naval Operations assigns three destroyers to U.N. mediator for the Palestine truce


Ingalls Authenticates Keel of Amphibious Assault Ship

Ingalls Shipbuilding Authenticates Keel of Amphibious Assault Ship Tripoli (LHA 7)

  Huntington Ingalls Industries authenticated the keel today for the future multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA 7). The warship is under construction at the company's Ingalls Shipbuilding division and was officially authenticated by its sponsor, Lynne Mabus, wife of U.S


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 23

Today in U.S. Naval History - June 23 1933 - Commissioning of USS Macon, Navy's last dirigible 1961 - Navy's first major low frequency radio station commissioned at Cutler, Maine 1972 - Navy helicopter squadron aids flood-stricken residents in Wilkes-Barre, Scranton


USS Slater is Homeward Bound

USS SLATER Starboard 2014.jpg

USS Slater, the last Destroyer Escort afloat in America, will soon return to her home berth in Albany, New York. Launched in 1944, Slater served gallantly in both the Battle of the Atlantic and the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 27

Today in U.S. Naval History: June 27 1813 - USS President anchors in Bergen, Norway 1950 - To support U.N. call to assist South Korea, Truman authorizes U.S. naval and air operations south of 38th Parallel, Korea For more information about naval history


RIMPAC Underway off Hawaii

U.S. Navy amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu during an exercise in the Pacific Ocean, June 23, 2014. Peleliu will participate in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. (U.S. Navy photo by Daniel Viramontes)

RIMPAC, the world’s largest international maritime exercise consisting of 20 plus nations and hundreds of aircraft, ships and submarines began yesterday in and around the Hawaiian Islands. The exercise will provide a unique training opportunity for fostering and sustaining cooperative


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 30

Today in U.S. Naval History - June 30 1815 - USS Peacock takes HMS Nautilus, last action of the War of 1812 1943 - Third Fleet Amphibious Force lands troops on Rendova Island while naval gunfire silences Japanese artillery 1951 - Naval Administration of Marianas ends


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 1

Commodore Richard Dale, U.S.N. (Image: Naval History and Heritage Command)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 1 1797 - Naval Regulations passed by Congress 1800 - First convoy duty; USS Essex escorts convoy of merchant ships from East Indies to U.S. 1801 - U.S. squadron under Commodore Dale enters Mediterranean to strike Barbary Pirates


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 2

USS Juneau (CL-119). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 2 1923 - Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 - Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 - Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. Navy conducts extensive unsuccessful search


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 8

USS Jeannette in 1879. Engraving by George T. Andrew after a design by M.J. Burns. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 8 1778 - Allied French fleet under Comte d'Estaing arrives in America. 1853 - Commodore Matthew C. Perry sails his squadron into Tokyo Bay. 1879 - USS Jeannette departs San Francisco to explore Arctic. 1944 - Naval bombardment of Guam begins.


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 9

USS Wasp (Official U.S. Navy Photograph from the collections of the Naval Historical Center)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 9 1846 - Sailors and Marines from USS Portsmouth occupy and raise flag over San Francisco. 1944 - Organized Japanese resistence ceases on Saipan, Marianas. 1960 - USS Wasp departs Guantanamo Bay to support United Nations effort to calm the newly






 
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