Marine Link
Monday, December 5, 2016

Interest in Offshore Exploration in Greenland Growing

July 24, 2006

Several of the world's largest oil companies hope to tap into possible offshore oil and gas reserves as Greenland opened a new round of concessions for exploration licenses in the fragile Arctic region. Eyes of an oil-thirsty world have turned to the shores of the semiautonomous Danish territory amid rising fuel prices, Mideast instability and concerns over future supplies. The Greenland government hopes to make big gains from any reserves found in its icy waters, but environmentalists say oil exploration there could damage a sensitive region already under threat by global warming. The names of companies attending the meeting and what conditions the Greenland government would put forth for exploration in the Disko Bay- the area being opened for the current round of concessions- remained undisclosed. Oil exploration off west Greenland started in the 1970s but stopped after five failed drilling attempts. Activities resumed in 2001 off Nuuk, the Greenland capital. Canadian company EnCana (ECA) last year became the first company to win a license for offshore oil and gas exploration off Nuuk.In 2008, Calgary, Alberta-based EnCana is expected to start drilling in areas believed to have reserves ranging from 400 million to 1.2 billion barrels of oil. (Source: Houston Chronicle)


 
Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2016 - Workboat Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News