Ferry Crew Fatigue the Cause of Hong Kong Accident

MarineLink
Wednesday, July 17, 2013
Photo courtesy of Fast Ferry Co. HK

A Hong Kong Marine Department (MARDEP) enquiry into damage & passenger injuries caused when a local fast ferry hit the anchor cable of a vessel, found that 5 crew members were making their 15th voyage.of the day. The MARDEP report reads as follows:

"While the ferry was sailing at a speed of 22.5 knots at the Western Fairway, the coxswain and the assistant coxswain claimed to see a white light of a fishing boat crossing ahead of the ferry from port to starboard. The coxswain then steered the ferry to port for about 30 seconds to avoid collision with the fishing boat. This maneuver was however not in compliance with the Collision Regulations.

The investigation revealed that the ferry had never returned to its planned route after taking such maneuver, and had maintained off-course by about 105 degrees. It was noted from the CCTV record that both the coxswain and assistant coxswain appeared to be fatigued and did not take proper look-out over this entire period. As a result, the ferry went into the North Lamma Anchorage and hit the anchor chain of a vessel at anchor with a speed of about 20 knots. The collision caused injuries to 11 passengers onboard the ferry.

The fatigue and inappropriate action of the coxswain and the assistant coxswain of the ferry were the contributing factors to the accident:
a) a proper look-out had not been maintained and the positions of the ferry were not checked regularly; and
b) fatigue appeared to have set-in on both the coxswain and the assistant coxswain probably due to their long working hours causing them to fall into a state of drowsiness momentarily.

To avoid recurrence of similar accidents, owners and operators of all local vessels, particularly those adopting the operation mode that requires long duty hours of the masters/coxswains, are reminded to ensure that the duty rosters of masters/coxswains should be provided with sufficient rest periods during operation to avoid fatigue."

Source: MARINE DEPARTMENT NOTICE NO. 83 OF 2013 (Navigational & Seamanship Safety Practices) 'Fatigue at work affecting safe navigation'.
 

Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

US Shippers, West Coast Dockworkers Union Resume Contract Talks

Negotiators for shipping lines and terminal operators at 29 U.S. West Coast ports resumed contract talks with the union for dockworkers on Thursday, as cargo backups continued at the ports,

Report: Dire Conditions in Indian Shipbreaking Yards

Report by Indian research institute reveals poor enforcement of occupational health and safety provisions   The working and living conditions at the shipbreaking yards of Alang,

Italian Shipbuilder Pleads Guilty to Environmental Crimes

An Italian shipping firm based in Genoa, Italy, pleaded guilty to violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships by falsifying required ships’ documents to hide

Casualties

Report: Dire Conditions in Indian Shipbreaking Yards

Report by Indian research institute reveals poor enforcement of occupational health and safety provisions   The working and living conditions at the shipbreaking yards of Alang,

Wrecked Bulker’s Bow Refloated, Scuttled off S.Africa

TITAN Salvage, Crowley Maritime Corp.'s Houston-based marine salvage, emergency response and wreck removal company, has refloated and scuttled the largest section of the wrecked bulk carrier, Smart.

Shell Resuming Nigeria EA Oil Production

Royal Dutch Shell said on Thursday it had resumed production of Nigerian EA crude oil and lifted its force majeure on the grade after completing repairs to a mooring platform.

Ferries

MacGregor RoRo Cargo Access Package For Ferry

MacGregor, part of Cargotec, has received a contract from German shipbuilder Flensburger-Schiffbau-Gesellschaft (FSG) for a comprehensive RoRo cargo access equipment package.

Ferry Capsizing Kills at Least 129 in Congo

At least 129 people are dead in the Democratic Republic of Congo after an overcrowded vessel sank on Lake Tanganyika in the early hours of Friday morning.   According to Laurent Kahozi Sumba,

Maritime Reporter @ 75: The Daily Cartoon

Maritime Reporter & Engineering News was founded by John J. O'Malley (1905-1980) in 1939, and today ranks as the world's largest audited trade publication in the world serving the maritime industry,

 
 
Maritime Security Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2911 sec (3 req/sec)