Marine Link
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Jail Sentence of 'Rena' Officers Applauded by MNZ

May 25, 2012

Photo credit MNZ

Photo credit MNZ

Master and Second Officer of 'Rena' are sentenced on a total of 11 charges laid by Maritime New Zealand (MNZ), following an investigation into the ship's grounding on the Astrolabe Reef off Tauranga

MNZ laid six charges against the Master, Mauro Balomaga, and five charges against the Second Officer, Leonil Relon, following the grounding. Both men pleaded guilty to all charges against them.The two men were  each sentenced to seven months imprisonment.

The Director of MNZ, Keith Manch, said the two senior officers, who were responsible for the navigation of the ship, had breached basic principles of safe navigation.

After a passage plan for the journey from Napier to Tauranga had been prepared, the Master had given approval for the Second Officer to deviate from the plan to make good time.

These alterations were not adequately recorded or an amended passage plan developed. Neither were the alterations verified using appropriate navigational methods.

Dangers to navigation, such as reefs, safe passing distances and adjustments to navigational equipment were not identified and highlighted.

The final alteration to the course of the ship, around 1.35am, put Rena directly on target to hit the Astrolabe Reef. No further steps were taken to project Rena's position forward along the new course, or estimate where the alteration would take the ship.

About 10 minutes before the grounding, the Astrolabe Reef appeared as an echo on Rena's radar. At this stage, there was sufficient time to make an effective alteration of course and avoid the reef. The Master saw the echo and assumed it was a small vessel – however, after looking for the vessel and not finding it, he dismissed it as a false echo.

When Rena ran aground, at 2.14am, the impact left the bow section stuck fast on the reef, and sheered about 60 metres of keel away from the bow section of the ship, which began taking on water.
Mr Manch said the Master and Second Officer had failed to implement and follow basic principles of passage planning to ensure the safe navigation of the vessel.

 



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