Arctic Policy Brief Issued by CIGI

press release
Tuesday, November 20, 2012

‘Great Melt’ in the Arctic calls for increased co-operation between Canada and United States, policy brief argues.
 

The “great melt,” an unprecedented geophysical change, in the Arctic is cause for heightened leadership, attention and cooperation between Canada and the United States. Without a national strategic vision, current policies are inadequate to protect economic and environmental interests, argues a new policy brief issued by The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI).
 

In Canada-US Arctic Marine Corridors and Resource Development, global governance experts John Higginbotham, Andrea Charron and James Manicom argue that “clear imperative” exists for the two North American countries to develop their marine resource and community potential for the Arctic. At present, both countries have failed to recognize the “economic development potential” in the Arctic — opportunities that could “contribute directly to local, regional and national economic growth.
 

“Intense activities in commercial, investment, diplomatic, legal, scientific and academic sectors abound in the new Arctic, but the region’s long-term significance is only gradually penetrating North American public consciousness,”  the policy brief states.
 

Higginbotham, Charron and Manicom lay out the maritime transportation and resource development challenges currently at play in the Arctic — from icebreaker capacity and lack of deep water ports to safety and environmental concerns. Overcoming such infrastructure and coordination challenges to develop and embrace Arctic opportunities, they argue, “will require an intense and focused effort in multi-level domestic and binational governance.” For starters, Canada could consider re-opening its consulate in Anchorage, Alaska, and as upcoming chair of the Arctic Council, it should “focus unambiguously upon responsible marine, resource and community development.”
 

In addition to providing ways forward for policy makers, the private sector and academics, the authors recommend the following for a North American Arctic strategy:
 

Support destination shipping in the short term and North American polar transit over the longer term, should this become economically feasible. Legal differences between the two North American nations could be finessed in practical, binational ways without sacrificing any party’s position of principle.
 

Create North American Arctic marine “highways.” Safe, secure and efficient maritime corridors or shipping lanes could be agreed to binationally, through mutually beneficial regulation and management. Improved Arctic corridor management and regulation would help to ensure that key routes would be the first to receive up-to-date and accurate charts, real-time movement monitoring and aids to navigation, tested search and rescue capabilities, and available robust icebreaker service. Tighter regulation of itinerant marine traffic is needed to improve safety and security, based on the present shortcomings of existing international maritime law.
Revisit plans for an Alaska-Yukon rail corridor, as well as other surface infrastructure elements, including all-weather airports, serving northern deep-water and community ports.
 

Establish a strict and safe temporary North American Arctic maritime regulatory regime in anticipation of the International Maritime Organization’s mandatory Polar Code, as Sweden and Finland have in the Baltic Sea.
 

Canada-US Arctic Marine Corridors and Resource Development is drawn in large part from discussions at the Arctic Marine Corridors and Resource Development Roundtable, organized by CIGI and Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, as part of Carleton University’s transport policy initiative. To access and download a free copy of this CIGI policy brief, click here.
 

  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

John Higginbotham is a senior distinguished fellow at Carleton University. In his previous roles with the federal government, he coordinated Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway Initiative at Transport Canada, was an assistant deputy minister in three departments and served abroad in senior positions in Washington, Hong Kong and Beijing.


Andrea Charron is assistant professor in political studies at the University of Manitoba. She is also a research associate at Carleton University’s Centre for Security and Defence Studies at NPSIA, where she was a post-doctoral fellow.
 

 

James Manicom is a CIGI research fellow, contributing to the development of the global security program. Previously, he held fellowships at the Ocean Policy Research Foundation in Tokyo and the Balsillie School of International Affairs. His current research explores Arctic governance, East Asian security and China’s role in ocean governance.

Maritime Reporter August 2013 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Marine Science

Coast Guard Preps for Arctic Research

A team of scientists from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Research and Development Center (RDC) will depart from Seward, Alaska, for a technology evaluation in the

Jinhai Heavy Industry Secures Another Invention Patent

Jinhai Heavy Industry of China has received patent rights for its large ship superstructure hoisting method after a state intellectual property review. The patent rights is for twenty years.

Scientific Team Arctic-bound Aboard Cutter 'Healy'

A team of scientists from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RDC) is to depart shortly from Seward, Alaska, for a technology evaluation in the Arctic

Government Update

Bill Promotes US LNG Vessel Transport

Congressman John Garamendi (D-CA-03), Ranking Member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure’s Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee, introduced H.

Japan Loans Petrobras $500m to Build Ship Platforms

Brazil's state-controlled oil company Petrobras signed on Friday a $500 million loan from Japan to build eight ship platforms for the oil industry, as part of the

MARAD, ABS Sign MOA for NDRF Class and Survey

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) announced it has signed a new Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS),

Arctic Operations

Coast Guard Preps for Arctic Research

A team of scientists from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Research and Development Center (RDC) will depart from Seward, Alaska, for a technology evaluation in the

Rosneft to Carry Out Ecologic Fishery Research in Laptev Sea

For the first time in history of Arctic Rosneft will carry out integrated ecologic fishery research on three licensed sites (LS) of Laptev Sea: Anisinsko-Novosibirsky,

Scientific Team Arctic-bound Aboard Cutter 'Healy'

A team of scientists from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RDC) is to depart shortly from Seward, Alaska, for a technology evaluation in the Arctic

Logistics

Bill Promotes US LNG Vessel Transport

Congressman John Garamendi (D-CA-03), Ranking Member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure’s Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee, introduced H.

SEACOR Holdings Announces Q2 Results

SEACOR Holdings Inc. has announced its results for its second quarter ended June 30, 2014. For the quarter ended June 30, 2014, net income attributable to SEACOR Holdings Inc.

Asia-N.Europe Container Freight Rates Jump 21%

Shipping freight rates for transporting containers from ports in Asia to Northern Europe jumped 21 percent to $1,455 per 20-foot container (TEU) in the week ended on Friday,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1757 sec (6 req/sec)