Great Lakes Shipping Returns to Normal

Tuesday, August 14, 2001
Shipping on the Great Lakes should be back to normal by early Monday evening, Canadian marine authorities said, as a 730-ft. freighter, which crashed into a lift bridge across the Welland Canal, has been towed away. "They're raising the bridge at the moment and they will have to make sure it (is secure) before telling the ships to move into the canal," said Sylvie Moncion, a spokeswoman for the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp., which operates the key marine route into central North America. Moncion said traffic on the Welland Canal portion of the Seaway system had been stalled by the accident, with 25 ships now waiting to go through the canal. She expected the canal to resume normal operations around 6:30 p.m. (2230 GMT). The Canadian grain carrier Windoc, carrying 26,000 tons of wheat, struck the bridge on late Saturday after it began to lower prematurely. The collision tore off the ship's wheelhouse and smokestack, setting the stern of the vessel ablaze and lighting up the night sky over the small town of Allanburg, Ontario. The ship's crew of 22 escaped with minor injuries, but the accident shut down the Welland Canal linking Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, a key section of the St. Lawrence Seaway, which connects international shipping with ports on the Great Lakes in Canada and the United States. Estimated cargo traffic on the Welland Canal was 37 million tons in 2000, much of which was shipments of iron ore and wheat for both North American and international markets. Canada's Transportation Safety Board is investigating the accident, which is expected to total several million dollars in damages to both the ship and the bridge. - (Reuters)
Maritime Reporter March 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navigation

Shipping Season Opens on the Mississippi

First tow marks unofficial opening to Mississippi River navigation season   M/V New Dawn arrived at Lock and Dam 2 near Hastings, Minn. Wednesday morning, marking

Garamendi Introduces Bipartisan GPS Backup Bill

Congressman John Garamendi (D-Fairfield, CA), the Ranking Member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation,

Lack of Ship Definition is a Threat to Investors

AKD says the lack of an unambiguous term to describe a ‘ship’ in several jurisdictions represents a potential threat to asset security for financiers, particularly

Finance

NORDEN CEO: Bulk Market Challenges to Continue

Klaus Nyborg, interim CEO at Denmark-based dry bulk and product tanker shipping company Dampskibsselskabet NORDEN A/S, expects difficult dry cargo market conditions

Turkey Maritime Sector Alive & Kicking

Located on the periphery of two great continents, Turkey has benefitted from being in a favored position right at the center of an assertive and fast growing economic area.

Advanced Drillships a Burden for Owners as Business Slows

Not so long ago, advanced drillships costing more than half a billion dollars each and capable of operating in ever-deeper waters practically guaranteed big profits for oil-rig operators.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Repair Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1855 sec (5 req/sec)