S.F. Cruise Ship Industry Growing

Monday, February 13, 2006
San Francisco’s cruise ship industry is booming. After years of declining business, the dry dock’s return to financial health means blue-collar jobs growth, tourist spending by visiting crews, sales tax for the city and fees for the Port of San Francisco. At least six, and possibly eight, cruise ships will be dry-docked there this year, up from one in 2000. Each contract generally ranges from $1 million to $5 million for piping, electrical, plumbing and painting upgrades. Millions more go to subcontractors, some of them local firms, that work on refurbishing cabins and redoing casinos, for example. Local businesses and city coffers also get a piece of the spending. For example, more than 1,000 crew members live on the Monarch while it’s docked, eating in restaurants, shopping and visiting tourist spots. San Francisco Ship Repair is rebounding after the Navy pulled out of the Bay Area in 1992. Business plummeted from $64 million in 1990 to its nadir of $22 million in 2001. Last year, revenues were $39 million from servicing a mix of military vessels, cargo tankers, tugs and cruise ships. The business was also able to capitalize on the downsizing of a Portland dry dock in 2001. (Source: San Francisco Examiner)
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