Scientists to Use Cruise Ships for Research

Wednesday, March 01, 2006
Hoping to collect decades of data, ocean scientist are enlisting cargo and cruise ships to measure water temperatures, ocean currents and even the height of clouds as the vessels ply their regular routes. To begin to address questions of large ocean patterns, such as the changing path of the Gulf Stream, scientists need more than the few years of data most scientific missions can provide, Malaysia Star reported. The long-term data that commercial ships can furnish is what has been historically so difficult to obtain. The volunteer programs are also cheaper, considering the cost of renting a dedicated research vessel for a single day could exceed $15,000. Scientists use marine and atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer to measure temperatures on the ocean's surface and the ceilometer to measure the altitude of clouds. The devices are attached to the decks and roofs of ships. With instruments affixed this year to the Norrona, a ferry that makes a roundtrip every week stopping in Denmark, Scotland and Iceland, scientists hope to learn more about the cold waters emptying out of the Arctic seas into the northern Atlantic Ocean. Scientists also have been using instruments attached to the cargo ship Oleander since 1992 to monitor the Gulf Stream as the vessel passes between Port Elizabeth, New Jersey, and Bermuda. And another ship, Nuka Arctic, has been helping since 1999 to give scientists a look at the Gulf Stream along its path between Denmark and Greenland. With such information regularly collected over a long period of time, researchers hope not just to observe a particular change but to gain an understanding of how the ocean behaves over time. The ships function similar to satellites, which probe through the atmosphere, down to the surface of the ocean. Commercial ships have a far larger presence on the ocean than either research or military vessels, and scientists are working to develop partnerships with them to make their research more cost efficient. (Source: Malaysia Star)
Maritime Reporter March 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Shipbuilding

BAE Systems to Expand San Diego Shipyard

BAE Systems announced it will invest approximately $100 million to expand drydocking capabilities at its San Diego shipyard.   The investment, which will include

Schmiedag and Wildauer Schmiedewerke: 'We Forge Partnerships'

Olaf Wiertz, Sales Director at Schmiedag GmbH (SDG) and Wildauer Schmiedewerke GmbH & Co. KG (WSW) said: “We are more than just a supplier to our customers – we are their partner.

Turkey Maritime Sector Alive & Kicking

Located on the periphery of two great continents, Turkey has benefitted from being in a favored position right at the center of an assertive and fast growing economic area.

Cruise Ship Trends

Holland America Line Ships Score 100

On recent routine United States Public Health inspections (USPHI) conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Holland America Line’s ms Statendam,

Carnival to Add Nine Ships to Cruise Fleet

Carnival Corporation enters into strategic partnerships to add nine cruise ships to its fleet over a four-year period starting in 2019; shipbuilders Fincantieri

US Cruise Industry Preparing for Cuba

U.S. cruise lines are preparing to enter uncharted waters -- Cuban waters.   Although U.S. tourists are still technically banned from visiting the Caribbean country,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1984 sec (5 req/sec)