Caymans Ban Cruise Ships at Port

Wednesday, May 09, 2007
The Cayman Islands government have banned cruise ships from anchoring at a port where their huge chains have damaged coral reefs, the AP reported. Environmental officials say some coral can be preserved despite extensive damage along the sea floor near the Spotts Dock facility, which is used as an alternative port when seas are too rough for cruise ships to call on the George Town harbor. A cruise ship anchoring for one day can destroy nearly an 1 acre (0.4 hectares) of intact reef, government officials said. Cruise ships capable of holding their position without anchoring will still be allowed to unload passengers in Spotts Bay, about 10 miles east of the capital. Source: AP
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