KEMA Collaborates on Offshore Energy Storage System

Monday, September 17, 2007
KEMA, in partnership with civil engineering firm Bureau Lievense and technology illustrators Rudolph and Robert Das, has developed an “Energy Island” concept to store power generated from an offshore wind farm. The innovative concept design is the initial result of an on-going feasibility study being conducted for Dutch energy companies.

The Energy Island designed by KEMA, Lievense and the Das brothers incorporates a new concept in pumped hydro storage – an inverse offshore pump accumulation station (IOPAC). On the Energy Island when there is a surplus of wind energy, the excess energy is used to pump sea water out of the interior ‘subsurface-lake’ into the surrounding sea. When there is a shortage of wind power, sea water is allowed to flow back into the interior ‘lake’ through commercially available generators to produce energy. The IOPAC is unique from conventional pumped hydro storage systems in that it would be stationed on an artificial island off the Dutch coast in the North Sea and comprised of a ring of dikes surrounding a 50 meter deep reservoir. The island itself would be built from materials dredged to deepen the interior reservoir.

KEMA analysis estimates that the proposed Energy Island storage system would have a maximum generation capacity of 1,500 MW, depending on the water level. It also would have an annual storage capacity of more than 20 GWh – enough energy to offset 500 to 840 kilotons of CO2 emissions. In the next phase of the feasibility study underway KEMA is further analyzing the costs and benefits of additional regulating reserve, download wind power, CO2 reduction, and environmental impact. Utilizing stored energy can help reduce the overall amount of CO2 emissions associated with electricity production, especially when combined with wind or other renewable energy resources. Investment in large scale energy storage can increase the efficiency of conventional power plants as well as offset investments in replacing or developing new conventional peak production capacity. In addition to providing an alternative for large scale electricity storage, the energy island concept has the potential to provide coastal protection, harbor and/or LNG terminal facilities, aquatic biomass, and eco-tourism opportunities. Construction of the energy island is dependent on seabed composition. The North Sea site studied includes a seabed with a thick layer of clay. The US is actively developing advanced energy storage technologies and systems through public-private partnership programs such as the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage System Program. Technologies in development include various battery systems, advanced flywheels, superconductivity, compressed air, and pumped hydro. The Energy Island concept is an important step forward in demonstrating the role of large-scale energy storage in enhancing the reliability of the power supply, stabilizing the cost of electricity, and reducing CO2 emissions.

Maritime Reporter March 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Offshore

New CEO for Evergas

Evergas has appointed Steffen Jacobsen as CEO of the company as of 8 May 2015 Mr. Jacobsen joined Evergas 1 February 2015 as Vice President, Fleet after almost 35 years in Maersk.

Italian Navy Takes Back Fishing Boat Seized Near Libya

The Italian navy took back control on Friday of a Sicilian fishing boat that had been seized overnight by unknown assailants near the Libyan coast, the defence ministry said.

Steelhead Introduces a New Yacht Crane

Steelhead Marine, a North American crane manufacturer, has expanded its product offering with the launch of the new E Series 1000 crane. Suited for commercial and recreational vessels,

Environmental

Shipping is Cutting CO2 Emissions

London-based shipping advisors Drewry Supply Chain Associates said that shipping liner operators have made significant inroads into cutting CO2 emissions.   In

Naval Authorities Rely on OSE Separators from GEA

The trend of modernizing ships and fitting them with more efficient separator systems, which has been noticeable since 2014 particularly in Europe and North America,

MacGregor's Pusnes bow loading systems for Suezmax Tankers

MacGregor, part of Cargotec, has secured contracts to supply Pusnes bow loading systems for three newbuild shuttle tankers intended for operations in Brazilian waters.

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Repair Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1397 sec (7 req/sec)