Builders Risk Policy Serves as Inland Marine Insurance

Tuesday, October 09, 2007
The US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled that, under Michigan law, a builders risk insurance policy is a form of inland marine insurance and is controlled by the statute of limitations applicable thereto. For our purposes, the decision is probably most interesting in its historical analysis of the insurance industry and the division of casualty insurance into two large groups: fire insurance and marine insurance. Under Michigan law, fire insurance claims must be submitted within one year of the casualty. All other casualty insurance claims are subject to a six-year statute of limitations. [Source: HK Law]

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