Proposals Requested for Federal Ballast Water Demonstration Project

Monday, July 08, 2002
The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD), the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are jointly requesting proposals for ballast water technology demonstration projects. Nearly $2.1 million, and/or the use of MARAD’s Ready Reserve Force ships as test platforms, will be made available for successful proposals. Interested parties may apply for funding, for use of a vessel, or both. Every day, large quantities of ballast water from areas all around the world are discharged from ships into the waters of the United States. In this ballast water are plants, animals, bacteria and pathogens that are not native to our nation’s ecosystems. Some of these organisms are microscopic; others may be large plants or free-swimming fish. Many have the potential to become aquatic nuisance species (ANS), which displace native species, degrade native habitats, spread disease, and disrupt human, social and economic activities that depend on our aquatic resources. Any ship carrying ballast water is a potential source of such invasion. The Federal Ballast Water Demonstration Project is a multi-agency effort that began with the Request for Proposals (RFP) issued in the Federal Register on June 6, 2002 [Federal Register: June 6, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 109)] [Page 38394 – 38939]. The RFP requests proposals for demonstration projects that may be funded under the NOAA Sea Grant Program and through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with MARAD Ready Reserve Force vessels available as test platforms. The Ready Reserve Force (RRF) is a fleet of cargo vessels maintained by MARAD and crewed by civilian mariners. The RRF is used for sealift in military action and in emergencies. During the past two years, some testing of new technologies has occurred aboard various privately owned vessels and at facilities and labs around the nation, but there has not yet been any large-scale testing and demonstrations aboard ships. Through this program, MARAD has developed a two-phased approach to move the ballast water treatment technology from laboratory testing to testing and demonstration aboard commercial ships. The first phase of the program will involve the use of RRF vessels at stationary sites on the East and West coasts of the U.S. as large test platforms. Technologies successful in the first phase will then move on to the sea trials. Promising technologies will then move on to phase two: pilot demonstrations on commercially operating U.S.-flag vessels. The deadline for proposals for use of a MARAD ship is July 8, 2002. Proposals for NOAA funding are due July 22, 2002. Awards are expected to be made by August 15, 2002.
Maritime Reporter February 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Indian Port Workers to Launch Indefinite Strike

Port and dock workers in India are planning to go on an indefinite strike starting March 16th – they are protesting the government’s move to corporatize major ports.

NORDEN Publishes CSR Report

Dampskibsselskabet NORDEN A/S has published its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) report 2014. Entitled, “On track”, the CSR report presents an overview of NORDEN’s CSR strategy,

LISCR Appoints New Managing Director for Hong Kong

The Liberian Registry has appointed shipping executive Gerry Buchanan as managing director of its dedicated Hong Kong office, the registry announced today.      As

Environmental

Arctic on Thin Ice

Arctic sea ice - the ice that freezes and floats on Arctic waters - is thinning at a steadier and faster rate than researchers previously thought, a new study finds.

Cargo Vessel Grounded on Scottish Coast Towed Today

The towing of the DFDS cargo vessel Lysblink Seaways began today at 1:00pm local time, the UK's Maritime Coast Guard Agency announced.   The vessel ran aground

Harbor Police Rescues Stranded Sea Lion

Sea lions are a common sight in San Diego Bay, but a sea lion wandering a busy roadway and then ending up in the back of a patrol car is slightly rarer.   The

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2366 sec (4 req/sec)