Wave of New Bulk Carriers Expected to Upset Freight Rates

Wednesday, September 20, 2000
Some shipping brokers expect spot freight rates for Panamax bulk carriers to decline next spring when a large number of new bulk carriers enter service. About 100 newly built bulk carriers with cargo capacities of 50,000 to 80,000 tons are to be delivered in 2001, up from about 70 vessels this year, possibly causing rates to fall, the brokers said. Spot rates for Panamax bulk carriers for the U.S. Gulf/Japan route have recently risen to three-and-a-half year highs. Japanese shipbuilders have landed a large proportion of orders to build those bulk carriers, which now constitute the largest and most important category of ships built in Japan.

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter July 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Offshore

Staying Afloat Down Under?

In recent years, Australia has been a major growth area for offshore gas production and a key driver of offshore CAPEX, says Clarksons Research.   However, the

China Asks U.S. to Support Resumption of Talks with Philippines

China's foreign minister has asked the U.S. secretary of state John Kerry to support the resumption of talks between China and the Philippines over the South China Sea,

VesselValue.com: $28.4B Worth of Ships Delivered to Date

As the calendar now indicates we have passed the half year mark on 2016, VesselValue.com offers insight on the number and value of all the 2016 built vessels that

Bulk Carrier Trends

LNG-fueled Bulker Ordered from Korea

Hyundai Mipo Dockyard (HMD) has signed a contract to build a 50,000 dwt bulk carrier with ILSHIN LOGISTICS. The project is a collaboration between POSCO and ILSHIN

Broad Declines drag Baltic Index down

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, tracking rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, fell on Tuesday on lower rates for capesize, panamax and supramax vessels.

How to Avoid Claims for Self-cooking Cargo

North P&I Club has advised its members to be extra vigilant during loading and transport of soya beans to ensure they do not get blamed for cargoes that start ‘cooking’ at sea.

 
 
Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0645 sec (16 req/sec)