Gladding Hearn Signs To Build New Vessel

Thursday, May 16, 2002
The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation of Somerset, Mass. signed a contract to build a 60-ft. vessel to replace the Institution's 46-ft. coastal vessel Asterias. Construction of the new vessel is estimated at a cost of $1.6 million, with delivery expected in March 2004. "The need for this type of vessel has increased dramatically over the past few years as our interests in our continental shelf continue to increase," said WHOI Director and President Robert Gagosian. "This vessel will provide quick and ready access to our new Martha's Vineyard Observatory and surrounding waters, enhancing our continuing efforts in coastal oceanography." The Asterias replacement, designed by Roger Long Marine Architecture, Inc. of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, will offer researchers many expanded capabilities, including a cruising speed of 20 knots, providing efficient and quick access to coastal waters including Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds and Massachusetts Bay. It can operate within a narrow weather window, as little as four hours, for distances up to 350 miles, which would enable it to reach New York harbor and the Gulf of Maine, where a number of Institution staff are conducting research or are interested in pursuing research projects. It is intended for use inshore, not offshore. The new vessel will have a single operator for day trips and can accommodate six people for overnight trips or up to 10 people for day trips. At $1,500 a day, its day rate is very competitive, making it a cost effective platform for instrument testing, coastal studies and educational programs. "The increased use of autonomous instruments and vehicles, our new observatory on the south coast of Martha's Vineyard, and an increased focus on coastal processes are among the many reasons we need a more capable vessel to meet changing science needs," said Wayne "Rocky" Geyer, chair of the Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department and a physical oceanographer who works in the coastal environment. "This new vessel will enable us to enhance our seagoing educational experience, bringing WHOI's tradition of leadership in marine operations into the near-shore environment. That experience has been limited somewhat by the realities of long cruises on our larger research vessels, which are generally 30 to 40 days in length. Opportunities for students to conduct research on a variety of coastal processes will now be within a day's reach with this vessel." According to Ernest "Dutch" Wegman, WHOI’s Port Engineer and Project Manager for this vessel, the Asterias replacement will provide high quality diver support including a dive platform, dive locker and shower. It will be able to handle complex instrument arrays and coastal moorings through a 10,000 lb. stern A-frame, and its versatile fantail and booms will enable scientists and engineers to tow new instrument systems. Among the standard instrumentation planned for the vessel are a flow-through water sampling system, a full suite of meteorological measurement systems (IMET), an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) and conductivity/temperature/density (CTD) with winch for a variety of physical oceanographic measurements, and clean power. "Scientists and engineers are pursing more complex problems and using increasingly sophisticated equipment they often design, build and need to test," Wegman said. "Their sea-going needs have changed considerably in the past decade as technology has advanced, and it became clear the Institution needed a new generation of near-shore vessel for a new generation of measurement systems which require nimble, quick response, but also considerable muscle for deploying complex arrays." The 46-ft. Asterias was built in 1980 and replaced a similar 40-ft. vessel of the same name which had served the Institution since its founding in 1930. The original Asterias was the Institution's first research vessel. Asterias will be retired from the Institution fleet when the new vessel arrives, but will continue to serve science, engineering and educational needs until that time. "Asterias is reaching the end of its useful life for current science and engineering projects in local waters," notes Vice President for Marine Operations Richard Pittenger. "The design for the new vessel reflects the increasing interest and research activity in coastal research at the Institution. Asterias has been a good vessel, but it is clear changing research needs and societal questions our staff seek to address require a much more capable vessel. This new vessel will provide researchers with a new generation of near-shore vessel with tremendous capabilities for many years to come."
Maritime Reporter October 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Technology

ClassNK Approves Niigata Dual-fuel Engine Design

Classification society ClassNK has granted approval to the design of the new 28AHX-DF dual-fuel engine developed by Niigata Power Systems Co., Ltd. The new engine

Subsea Defense & the Changing Paradigm of Submarine Programs

Technology and dynamic mission profiles have driven change in the defense industry, Hydro Group Plc Managing Director Doug Whyte, explores the changing paradigm of submarine programs,

From Security to Efficiency Modern Vessel Tracking

More so than many other fields of business, the maritime industry is focused on cost, which in turn gives the appearance of being conservative towards technology.

Contracts

Diana Extends Containership Time Charters

Diana Containerships Inc. announced direct continuation of time charter agreements for m/v Cap Domingo and m/v Cap Doukato   Diana Containerships Inc., a global

BMT Supports Samalaju Port Development

BMT subsidiaries in the Asia-Pacific region have been awarded a contract to provide design expertise for an advanced bulk-material handling system for the emerging port of Samalaju in East Malaysia.

EU: Ships Will Measure CO2 Emissions

Shippers to begin monitoring from 2018; Environmental groups say law is weak, shippers favorable. The shipping sector will for the first time have to monitor

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.4359 sec (2 req/sec)