Ocean Carriers Get Marginal Impact From Capacity Cuts

Friday, February 08, 2002
Total container capacity supply by ocean carriers on the three main east/west shipping trades rose by an average of five percent in 2001 despite the recent attempts of several carriers to remove excess capacity, according to a report released this week by ComPair Data Inc., a global ocean shipping research and information technology firm based in Jacksonville, Fla. Several ocean carriers in the transpacific and Asia/Europe routes made capacity cut-backs in the last three months of 2001, according to the January 2002 World Liner Supply report from ComPair Data, leading to an average 1-percent reduction in east/west capacity. But those reductions did not outweigh the addition of substantial new vessel capacity early last year or the ongoing expansion of other carriers, which led to the overall annual capacity increase. Results of the January 2002 World Liner Supply report show that transpacific shipping lines have expanded capacity by three percent between January 2001 and January 2002. Transpacific capacity currently amounts to over 196,000 TEUs a week (equivalent to a yearly one-way capacity of 10.2 million TEUs), down six percent from the corresponding figures in October 2001, but up from capacity offered in January 2001. "Capacity growth has slowed down, but there are still concerns about a further rise in over-capacity in the major trades," said Hayes H. Howard, president of ComPair Data. "Intermediaries, shippers and carriers are now carefully watching the competitive pressures and vessel delivery and layup trends that are driving over-capacity, as this will have a major impact on the bottom lines of their providers and, ultimately, their own companies," he added. In the Asia/northern Europe/Mediterranean trade, ocean carriers continued to add capacity in 2001, reaching a total one-way capacity of about 143,000 TEUs a week (equivalent to 7.4 million TEUs a year) at the beginning of January. The report does not incorporate changes in capacity due to be implemented by carriers during January and February. The alliances that have added the most capacity during the last 12 months are: the COSCO/"K" Line/Yang Ming alliance in the Asia/Europe trade (+35 percent) and transpacific trade (+18 percent); the Evergreen/Lloyd Triestino group in the transpacific (+20 percent); the New World Alliance (APL, Hyundai and MOL) in the Asia/Europe trade (+21 percent); and Mediterranean Shipping Co. in the transatlantic (+7 percent). These are just some of the highlights from the latest World Liner Supply report, which tracks capacity, service and partnership changes for all liner carriers and their ships operating on 12 major trades worldwide. For a more in-depth analysis of global capacity trends, please contact: Philip Damas, Director, ComPair Data: +44 20 8970 2623, London, U.K., reports@compairdata.com.
Maritime Reporter March 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

Three NOAA scientists honored by White House

The White House yesterday awarded three NOAA scientists with Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers. The award is the highest honor given

Australia's GHG fall by 0.8 %

Australia's greenhouse gas emissions fell 0.8 percent in 2013, according to government data, driven by lower electricity demand and a bigger share of renewables in the energy mix.

U.S. GHGas down by 10 % - EPA

U.S. greenhouse gas emissions fell nearly 10 percent from 2005 to 2012, more than halfway toward the United States' 2020 target pledged at United Nations climate talks,

Container Ships

Search is on for Man Overboard in the Pacific

The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for a male crewmember reported overboard from a container ship approximately 805 miles northeast of Oahu, Monday. Watchstanders

Ben3D Introduces ContainerTug 600S

Ben3D BV Naval Architecture introduce in collaboration with Oonincx Shipbuilding BV the innovative ContainerTug 600S. A strong, compact Dutch built workboat with

Cargo Sits Waiting a Fortnight in Asia: Analysts Seek Reasons

Jochen Gutschmidt, head of global transport procurement at Nestle, asked the Global Liner Shipping Conference in Hamburg last week: “Why is cargo waiting in Asia

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1997 sec (5 req/sec)