Are You Ready for HNS?

Thursday, April 22, 2004
London law firm Lawrence Graham says shipping is focusing on complying with security requirements, but another Convention soon to be enforced will have major ramifications for all aspects of shipping. Are you ready for the Hazardous and Noxious Substances Convention 1996?

Writing in the latest issue of Shipping Lawgram, Imogen Rumbold, shipping partner, says the HNS Convention is likely to come into force in the next two years. Charterers and receivers will pay more, ports and terminals face new liabilities, shipowners will need new insurance and documentation, P&I Clubs must set up new guarantees, authorities around the world will have more requirements to police and in any accident to almost any ship claimants for environmental damage will have new legal remedies to pursue. Yet awareness of the Convention is low, and there has been little preparation in most areas of shipping.

HNS 1996 will provide a compensation regime for damage arising from an incident involving Hazardous and Noxious Substances during their carriage by sea. The Convention covers not only pollution and property damage but also death and injury for incidents involving chemicals, LNG, LPG and oil (where the IOPC Fund/CLC do not apply). The wide and multi-sourced definition of HNS means that almost every ship afloat will be affected in some way by the HNS Convention. The second result of the wide definition is that deciding who will pay to the HNS Fund, and how much, is very complex. Ultimately, many thousands of importers, receivers and terminals world-wide will be affected, as will most shipowners and all P&I Clubs.

Maritime Reporter March 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

Ex-BP Employee Settles Insider-trading Oil Spill Case

A former 20-year veteran of BP plc who oversaw the company's cleanup efforts from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will pay more than $224,000 to settle civil charges

Somali Pirate Sentenced to 12 Years by German Court

A German court sentenced a Somali asylum-seeker to 12 years in jail on Thursday, for his involvement in the pirate hijacking of a tanker in the Indian Ocean in 2010.

DHL Expects Immunity in Price Fixing Investigation

Deutsche Post expects its DHL forwarding business to be granted immunity from prosecution and fines by Singapore antitrust authorities, who are investigating 11 companies for alleged price fixing,

Navy

NATO to bolster defence of E.European Allies

NATO is sending part of its naval rapid reaction force to the Baltic Sea as part of a drive to step up the defence of eastern European allies in response to the crisis inĀ Ukraine,

UN Seeks Sanctions Waiver to Ship Arms to Mali

The United Nations is seeking an exemption from a U.N. Security Council arms embargo on Ivory Coast so it can ship weapons and military equipment across the East

US Navy Vessel Heads Home Following Fire

U.S. Fleet Forces announced late Monday that USS Hue City (CG 66) would return to her homeport of Mayport, Fla. on her own power following a fire that occurred April 14.

 
 
Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0945 sec (11 req/sec)