Transport Canada Announces New Security Requirements

Thursday, October 23, 2003
Transport Minister David Collenette today announced a new marine security-reporting requirement for a wide range of Canadian-flagged vessels and port facilities. The Canadian requirement will complement new security rules announced today by the U.S. Coast Guard. "We have moved ahead with this action in response to input from stakeholders on the importance of a comprehensive security regime, our own assessment of the risks and threats in the marine sector, and our consultations with U.S. authorities," said Mr. Collenette. "Moreover, Transport Canada and the U.S. Coast Guard are working closely together to coordinate and harmonize the marine security regimes of the two countries, so that Canadian-flagged ships that meet our security standards can enter U.S. harbours." With today's announcement, operators of certain classes of vessels operating on international voyages or on the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway will be required to identify themselves to Transport Canada for marine security purposes. These include: · cargo vessels of 100 gross tons or greater; · towing vessels greater than eight metres in length engaged in towing certain classes of barge; and · passenger vessels carrying more than 12 passengers. Port facilities that serve SOLAS-class vessels must also meet this requirement. SOLAS refers to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea of the International Marine Organization and applies to vessels that have a displacement greater than 500 tons which operate internationally. Fishing vessels and pleasure craft are exempt from this requirement. Once vessel operators have reported, they will be requested to conduct a security assessment and develop a security plan for submission to Transport Canada. Following Transport Canada approval of a vessel security plan, the department will issue the operator a security certificate that will allow them to enter U.S. and Canadian waters. A similar process applies to U.S. vessels under U.S. regulations. This approach builds on Transport Canada's commitment to implement new marine security regulations for vessels and port facilities by July 1, 2004, as required by the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. The deadline for reporting is November 28, 2003. Vessel and port facility operators that have already reported to Transport Canada and are developing security plans need not do so again.
Maritime Reporter August 2013 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Maritime Security

RIMPAC Draws ADF Closer to Amphibious Future

More than 800 Australian Navy, Army and Air Force personnel are on their way home after taking part in RIMPAC, the world’s largest naval exercise, which concluded in Hawaii today.

Kenya Charges 9 Foreigners over Heroin Haul

Nine foreign nationals were charged in a Kenyan court on Thursday with trafficking the biggest ever single seizure of drugs at the Indian Ocean port of Mombasa.

Video: RIMPAC 2014 Ships Underway

The U.S. Navy posted a video showing Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014 operations underway. Watch as 42 ships and submarines representing 15 international

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Electronics Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0900 sec (11 req/sec)