New Reporting Requirements for Ships

Friday, October 05, 2001
Most Ships entering U.S. ports will have to provide 96-hour advance notice of arrival (NOA) to the U.S. coast Guard along with crew, passenger, and cargo information under new rules that went into effect October 4.

A 24-hour advance notice has been the requirement for ships calling at U.S. ports. As a result of the September 11 tragedy, ships have been directed by U.S. Coast Guard order to provide advance notice plus detailed information about crews, passengers and cargoes.

The new temporary rules will also suspend some existing exemptions from NOA reporting and will make some changes in notice of departure (NOD) requirements for vessels carrying certain dangerous cargoes.

For now, ships reporting under the rules will continue to send their information to the Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP) office where they plan to arrive. Beginning October 15, however, most NOA and NOD reports will be made to the Coast Guard’s new National Vessel Movement Center (NVMC). Reporting to the NVMC will streamline the notification process and the longer advance notice will allow the Coast Guard and other U.S. law enforcement agencies more time to review the information and plan for ship arrivals.

Maritime businesses, ship operators, and others involved in commercial vessel operations should review the new rules for details such as prior NOA reporting exemptions that will still exist, special provisions for Great Lakes shipping, and phone numbers and contact information for the NVMC.

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