This Day in Coast Guard History – March 2

Tuesday, March 02, 2010

1792- Congress authorized the revenue cutters to fire on merchant ships that refused to "bring to."

1799- Congress authorized that "Revenue Cutters shall, whenever the President of the United States shall so direct, cooperate with the Navy of the United States during which time they shall be under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, and the expenses thereof shall be defrayed by the agents of the Navy Department."

1799- Congress authorized revenue cutter officers to board all ships of the United States within four leagues of the U.S., if bound for the U.S. and then search and examine them, certifying manifest, sealing hatches and remaining on board until they arrived in port.  They were also authorized to search ships of other nations in United States' waters and "perform such other duties for the collection and security of the Revenue" as directed by the Secretary of the Treasury.

1799- Congress authorized cutters and boats to be "distinguished from other vessels by an ensign and pendant" with the marks thereon prescribed by the President of the United States, to fire on vessels who refused to bring to after the pendant and ensign had been hoisted and a gun fired as a signal, masters to be indemnified from any penalties or actions for damages for so doing, and be admitted to bail if any one is killed or wounded by such firing.  On August 1, 1799, Secretary Oliver Wolcott, Jr., prescribed that the " ensign and pennant’’ should consist of "Sixteen perpendicular stripes, alternate red and white, the union of the ensign to be the arms of the United States in dark blue on a white field." There were sixteen states in the Union at that time.

1799-  Congress authorized the President to sell cutters unfit for service and the Secretary of Treasury to apply an unexpended balance of proceeds in the purchase and construction of revenue cutters. (This authority was revoked March 3, 1845).

1807-  Congress outlawed the importation of slaves into the United States.  The Revenue Marine enforced the law on the sea.

1868-  By Act of Congress (15 Stat. L., 249), the Lighthouse Board was "authorized, when in their judgment, it is deemed necessary, to place a light-vessel, or other suitable warning of danger, on or over any wreck or temporary obstruction to the entrance of any harbor, or in the channel or fairway of any bay or sound."

1889-  Congress authorized the Secretary of Treasury to keep rivers clear to afford marine species access to their spawning grounds.

1912- The Revenue cutter Hartley seized the vessel Morning Star in Oakland Creek and arrested her crew for carrying 21 "contraband" Chinese migrants.

(Source: USCG Historian’s Office)
 

Maritime Reporter February 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Coast Guard

Container Ship Runs Aground at Fremantle Port

A ship that ran aground at Fremantle Port early Saturday has been refloated. The 62,000-tonne Denmark-registered container ship Maersk Garonne became stuck in soft sand about 500m off South Mole.

Coast Guard Foundation Announces 2015 Scholarships

The Coast Guard Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to the education and welfare of Coast Guard members and their families, announced yesterday that

Crowley Crew Aids Ill-fated Catamaran

The crew of the Crowley-managed, 393-foot, heavy lift vessel Ocean Crescent recently provided assistance to five people aboard the damaged and drifting catamaran

History

ST Engineering Y-O-Y Profits Slip

Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd  reported today its full year financial results ended 31 December 2014 (FY2014) with a Group revenue of $6.54b compared to $6.

MCPON Stevens Delivers Congressional Testimony

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Michael Stevens testified before Congress Feb. 25. Stevens appeared before the House and Armed Services

Containership Becomes Largest to Sail the Thames

The Munkebo Maersk became the largest ship to ever sail up the River Thames as it called at DP World London Gateway, the U.K.’s newest deep-sea port hub. The 399-meter-long,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Navigation Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0905 sec (11 req/sec)