Alaska Lawmakers Mull Cruise Passenger Fee

Monday, April 24, 2000
Cruise companies would pay a fee of $50 for each passenger sailing Alaskan waters under a bill being considered by the state legislature. The bill, which passed the state Senate by a 14-6 vote and is now under review by the state House, is one of several proposals at the state and local levels to better control the burgeoning cruise ship crowds in Alaska.

Over 600,000 cruise passengers visited the Inside Passage in the state's southeast panhandle last year, more than double the number recorded a decade ago. State Sen. Rick Halford, the measure's sponsor, said the fee was a bargain for companies that reap huge financial rewards selling Alaska tours. The companies pay a $10-per-passenger fee in Vancouver, British Columbia and other ports of embarkation, he said in floor debate.


Cruise Ship Trends

Lucas Marine, Harbor Breeze Cruises Partner to Cut Fuel Costs

Lucas Marine is partnering with Harbor Breeze Corporation to help reduce the yacht charter and cruise company's fuel costs, maintenance and environmental impact in Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors.

Pods Versus Water Lubricated Props

Thordon Bearings has called on the marine industry to investigate the characteristics of both conventional seawater-lubricated propeller shaft systems and podded

Grand Bahama Shipyard Adds Four Executives

Grand Bahama Shipyard Limited (GBSL), a Caribbean shipyard providing retrofit, refurbishment and revitalization to cruise and commercial vessels, has added four

Navy

US Navy Ships Conduct Astern Replenishment-at-sea

“While replenishments-at-sea are routine, astern refueling is unique and requires precise navigation and coordination,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jason Ileto, fleet replenishment scheduler for Commander,

Philippines: Sea Dispute Won't Shift Ties with China, U.S.

The Philippines' territorial dispute with China over the South China Sea has not caused Manila to rebalance diplomatic ties with either its ally, the United States,

This Day In Naval History: August 24

1814 - During the War of 1812, the British invade Md. and burn Washington, D.C. Commodore Thomas Tingey, superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard, burns the Navy

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0182 sec (55 req/sec)