B.C. Ferries Defends Crew

Tuesday, June 06, 2006
According to reports, the head of B.C. Ferries is questioning the suggestion that a lack of crew training may have played a role in the sinking of the Queen of the North. The company was interviewed after a letter was sent from the Transportation Safety Board. The safety board's letter outlined its preliminary findings into the March incident. The company said that the ferries crews are extremely well trained and qualified, but the letter says crew members were unfamiliar with the Queen of the North's new steering and navigation system. The ferry hit an island and sank to the bottom of Wright Sound south of Prince Rupert on March 22. Ninety-nine passengers and crew survived, but two are missing and presumed drowned. Source: Canadian Press
Maritime Reporter February 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Maritime Safety

Jack W. Fisher Passes Away at 73

Jack W Fisher, president of JW Fishers Mfg. passed away at home after a brief illness on February 20, 2015. He was 73 years old.   The JW Fishers business was started because Fisher,

Piracy Still a Big Threat in the Indian Ocean

Underestimating the security risk in the Indian Ocean could put ships in danger once again, says maritime security company MAST Ltd.   “Whilst recent reports

St. Lawrence Seaway Opening Date Pushed Back

Tthe opening date for the St. Lawrence Seaway 2015 navigation season has been delayed following review and consideration of factors and conditions affecting safe

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1587 sec (6 req/sec)