Bentley: Security Funding Gap Puts IMO Nations in Same Boat as U.S

Monday, October 20, 2003
The global effort to combat the threat of terrorists using maritime transport to deliver weapons of mass destruction is increasingly compromised by the imposition of under-funded security initiatives on ports and shipping interests, warned Helen Delich Bentley while speaking in Greece October 19. Bentley told an international shipping seminar that new International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) security regulations governing the maritime operations of 162 member states are strikingly similar – in both its regulatory sweep and inadequate level of accompanying funding – to recent Congressional legislation targeting America’s maritime community. “Where’s the money?” said Bentley in addressing the Contribution of Ports in the Regional Development Conference in Patras. The remarks continue Bentley’s campaign to redress the global maritime community’s problematic post 9/11 double bind – the heightened risk of attack, and high costs of implementing under-funded security measures. While “there can be no argument about the need for new security architecture…in all (transportation) modes,” said Bentley, shipping’s voluminous and far-flung cargo traffic “would seem to provide aspiring terrorists with the most inviting window of opportunity.” Bentley, former chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission and five-term Maryland Congresswoman, is a strong supporter a strong national defense. She presently serves as a lobbyist and consultant for various maritime and business interests, including the Maryland Port Administration.
Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

Costa Rica Approves APM Terminals Project

Port operator APM Terminals, a unit of Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk, said on Friday Costa Rica's environment agency had approved the construction of its Moin Container Terminal project.

NOAA: US to See More Floods from Sea Level Rise

Most of U.S. coast may see 30 or more days a year of floods up to 2 feet above high tides. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened

Maritime Security

Damen Outfitting First of Nine Bahamas Patrol Boats

The first of nine Damen Stan Patrol 3007s ordered by the Royal Bahamas Defense Force has arrived at Damen Shipyards Gorinchem in the Netherlands for outfitting.

USCG on Cuba Policy Changes

The U.S. Coast Guard missions and operations in the Southeast remain unchanged. The Coast Guard strongly discourages attempts to illegally enter the country by taking to the sea.

NASSCO Opens Bremerton Repair Facility

General Dynamics NASSCO celebrated the grand opening of its new location in Bremerton, Wash., yesterday. The facility will support the company’s recently-awarded contract to repair and maintain U.

 
 
Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1279 sec (8 req/sec)