Bentley: Security Funding Gap Puts IMO Nations in Same Boat as U.S

Monday, October 20, 2003
The global effort to combat the threat of terrorists using maritime transport to deliver weapons of mass destruction is increasingly compromised by the imposition of under-funded security initiatives on ports and shipping interests, warned Helen Delich Bentley while speaking in Greece October 19. Bentley told an international shipping seminar that new International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) security regulations governing the maritime operations of 162 member states are strikingly similar – in both its regulatory sweep and inadequate level of accompanying funding – to recent Congressional legislation targeting America’s maritime community. “Where’s the money?” said Bentley in addressing the Contribution of Ports in the Regional Development Conference in Patras. The remarks continue Bentley’s campaign to redress the global maritime community’s problematic post 9/11 double bind – the heightened risk of attack, and high costs of implementing under-funded security measures. While “there can be no argument about the need for new security architecture…in all (transportation) modes,” said Bentley, shipping’s voluminous and far-flung cargo traffic “would seem to provide aspiring terrorists with the most inviting window of opportunity.” Bentley, former chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission and five-term Maryland Congresswoman, is a strong supporter a strong national defense. She presently serves as a lobbyist and consultant for various maritime and business interests, including the Maryland Port Administration.

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter May 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

Design Concept: Zero Emissions Cargo Ship

The designs for a multi access zero emissions cargo ship will be unveiled at the 5th Natural Propulsion Seminar in Wageningen, Netherlands, on Tuesday, May 24. The

First Cruise Company Fined under Australia’s New Fuel Rules

Australia’s NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has fined Carnival PLC $15,000 after one of its P&O Cruises ships, the Pacific Jewel, breached new low sulfur fuel regulations in Sydney Harbour.

HUMMEL LNG Hybrid Barge Begins Second Season

For over one year the HUMMEL has been contributing to improved air quality at the port of Hamburg. Becker Marine Systems’ LNG Hybrid Barge will also be supplying

Maritime Security

ABS: Sharpening its Global View

The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS), already one of the world’s well-regarded classification societies, recently restructured its ranks to meet the perpetually evolving needs of its customers.

South Africa arrests Chinese ships for illegal squid fishing

South Africa's navy has detained three Chinese ships with around 100 crew on board on suspicion of illegal squid fishing, officials said on Monday. The ships

NATO to Boost Effort to Stop Mediterranean Smugglers

NATO agreed on Thursday to broaden its operations in the Mediterranean to help the European Union stop criminals trafficking refugees from North Africa but will

 
 
Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0773 sec (13 req/sec)