BP Marine Hosts Enviro Conference

Tuesday, February 28, 2006
As debate runs high around how best to prepare for impending environmental legislation, industry thought-leaders and shipping engineers are preparing to gather in Asia to share experiences and debate the way forward.

Following the success of last year’s Winds of Change event in Copenhagen, BP Marine is hosting nearly 80 representatives from Asia Pacific-based shipping companies at two similar technical conferences next month.

Taking place in Singapore on 13th March and Hong Kong on 16th March, the events will feature keynote addresses on current oil market trends, environmental legislation, abatement technologies and low sulphur fuel oil challenges. They are also a forum for delegates to discuss the operational and procurement implications of the forthcoming IMO and EU legislation surrounding sulphur emissions.

Parris Beverly, managing director of BP Marine fuels, said: “BP Marine is taking a proactive stance in dealing with the new environmental directives, the impact of which will be felt by many of the world’s busiest maritime channels. We are expecting two very interactive events in which BP Marine will offer practical advice around both marine fuels and lubricants and delegates will share their views and experiences.”

The revised sulphur emission regulations come into force on 19th May 2006 when the Baltic Sea becomes the first Sulphur Emission Control Area (SECA). In such areas, the maximum fuel sulphur content that ships will be permitted to burn may not exceed 1.5% m/m compared to the current global limit of 4.5% m/m. However, if abatement technology is in place a higher sulphur fuel oil may be used as long as the emissions are comparable to burning a fuel of 1.5% m/m by mass or less.

Jill Nguyen, managing director of BP Marine lubricants, said: “In preparing to reduce the environmental impact of marine fuels and lubricants, shipping companies have a complex range of issues to take into consideration. By gathering some of the most experienced technical brains in the region together, we are aiming to explain the parameters within which shipping companies have to work and provide practical advice around the options available.”

The Winds of Change events are designed to help customers prepare for environmental compliance by explaining the technical and financial implications of low sulphur fuel oil and lubricant usage as well as the logistics of supply.

Kjeld Aabo, Chairman of CIMAC Working Group – “Fuels” and Senior Manager of MAN B&W, said: “With even more rigorous environmental requirements on the horizon, it is essential that shipping companies take action now. By 2010 sulphur emissions limits of 0.1% will be in place in all EU ports and the complex new processes required for compliance need immediate consideration.”

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