Canada Port Gets First Radiation Detector

Thursday, December 15, 2005
Federal officials have installed Canada's first radiation detector at the port of Saint John in New Brunswick in a bid to protect the country against nuclear terrorism, the Canadian Press reports. While Saint John, N.B., is the first port to get the nuclear detection devices, all major Canadian ports soon will be equipped with the anti-terrorism technology. The radiation detection program is a key part of Ottawa's $172-million plan to beef up marine security - all stemming from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The devices, which have been in use for two weeks in Saint John, detect radiation inside containers. The detector is located on two large concrete columns. The containers are driven through the scanning portal after they have been loaded on trucks. Source: Canadian Press
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