Canada Shipping Act, 2001 Enters Force

Thursday, July 12, 2007
The Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (CSA 2001) came into effect on July 1, 2007, said the Honourable Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. It replaces the Canada Shipping Act (CSA) as the principal legislation governing safety in marine transportation and recreational boating, as well as protection of the marine environment.

"The coming into force of CSA 2001 is a significant milestone in Canada's maritime history," said Minister Cannon. "After more than one hundred years, new legislation has been enacted that values, first and foremost, the principles of safety and protection of our marine environment."

The new Act promotes the sustainable growth of the shipping industry without compromising safety. It represents an updated and streamlined version of the original CSA, making it clearer and easier to understand. The CSA 2001:

· promotes safety and provides better protection for the marine environment, through new and enhanced regulations;

· shifts from an inspection-based regime to a compliance-based regime, where vessel operators are encouraged to take a more active approach to safety;

· introduces a new method of enforcement with the introduction of administrative monetary penalties;

· replaces the Board of Steamship Inspection with the new Marine Technical Review Board; and

· establishes a new set of voyage classifications for the safer operation of vessels.

The CSA 2001 will help the marine community operate in a manner that is safer, more efficient, environmentally sound, and responsive to the needs of Canadians in a global economy. It applies to Canadian vessels operating in all waters and to foreign vessels operating in Canadian waters, ranging from canoes and kayaks to cruise ships and tankers.

Although the new Act was passed in 2001, it now comes into effect, as time was needed to review existing regulations, develop new regulations, and consult with a wide range of marine stakeholders. Some regulations come into effect immediately, and consultations continue as Transport Canada develops further regulations that support the Act.

Members of the marine community are encouraged to participate in education and awareness initiatives, and help contribute to the development of a safety culture within the industry. For more information about environmental protection or environmental response systems, please visit Transport Canada's Marine Safety Operations and Environmental Programs website at

www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/oep.

If you would like more information about the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 reform, please visit the Canadian Marine Advisory Council website at

www.cmac-ccmc.gc.ca.

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