CARB Releases New Regulations for California Air Emissions

Monday, December 18, 2006
The California Air Resources Board (CARB) released its new regulations imposing emission limits and requirements for auxiliary diesel engines and diesel-electric engines on ocean-going ships in “Regulated California Waters”. The regulations come in two virtually identical versions. The Title 13 version is related to mobile sources and fuels. The Title 17 version comes under the toxic air contaminants regime. Either way, the basic requirements are the same. These provisions apply to US and foreign ocean-going ships in California waters and out to 24 nautical miles offshore. [Note: The assertion of state jurisdiction to waters more than three nautical miles offshore is highly controversial.] Covered vessels must utilize either marine gas oil or marine diesel oil at or below 0.5% sulfur content. Alternatively, the vessel may use alternative control measures to reduce its emissions to the same level or, in certain situations, the vessel may pay a noncompliance fee. The vessel must also maintain records showing when it entered and departed California waters and when it switched fuels. Records must also be kept regarding fuel purchases and sulfur content. The regulations come into effect on 1 January 2007. The rules become more onerous three years later, when vessels may only use marine gas oil and the maximum sulfur content is reduced to 0.1%. Source: HK Law
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