CBP – 10 + 2 Rule Published

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

The US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued the interim rule regarding importer security filing and additional carrier requirements (better known as “10 + 2”).  The rule will require importers to notify CBP at least 24 hours before cargo is loaded on a vessel bound for the United States of the following: (1) manufacturer or supplier name and address; (2) seller name and address; (3) buyer name and address; (4) “ship to” name and address; (5) container stuffing location; (6) stuffer name and address; (7) importer of record number; (8) consignee number(s); (9) country of origin; and (10) the commodity’s Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States [HTSUS] number.  A range of acceptable initial responses will be allowed with regard to elements (1), (4), (9), and (10) above, with the importer required to provide updated and more specific responses as the information becomes available, but in no event later than 24 hours prior to arrival in a US port.  If unknown prior to lading on the vessel, elements (5) and (6) [stuffing location and stuffer name and address] may be delayed, but must be provided no later than 24 hours prior to arrival in a US port.

The carrier will have to provide the following information within 48 hours of the vessel’s departure en route the United States: (1) the vessel stowage plan; and (2) container status messages.  The interim rule comes into effect on January 26, 2009.  Assuming an annual discount rate of 3%, CBP estimates that the cost of compliance from 2009 through 2018 will be $7.6-56 billion.  Comments should be submitted by June 1, 2009.  CBP will adopt a flexible enforcement policy during the first twelve (12) months as the regulated community adapts to the increased reporting requirements.  73 Fed. Reg. 71729  (November 25, 2008).

(Source: Holland & Knight)

Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

US Plans to Shut Royalty Loophole on Coal Exports

U.S. coal companies will no longer be able to settle royalties at low domestic prices when they make lucrative sales to Asia according to reforms proposed by the Interior Department on Friday.

Denmark Issues New Pilotage Regulations

In an effort to make the pilotage market more efficient, the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) issued several new regulations following on amendments to the pilotage act.

US Shippers, West Coast Dockworkers Union Resume Contract Talks

Negotiators for shipping lines and terminal operators at 29 U.S. West Coast ports resumed contract talks with the union for dockworkers on Thursday, as cargo backups continued at the ports,

Government Update

Madsen to Chair Norway’s Research Council Executive Board

Henrik O. Madsen appointed chairman of the executive board of the Research Council of Norway   DNV GL president and CEO Henrik O. Madsen was appointed as chairman

MARAD Publishes US ATB, ITB Database

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) released what it is calling a first-of-its-kind public database that chronicles U.S.-flagged, privately owned domestic

Costa Rica Approves APM Terminals Project

Port operator APM Terminals, a unit of Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk, said on Friday Costa Rica's environment agency had approved the construction of its Moin Container Terminal project.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Salvage Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1161 sec (9 req/sec)