Coast Guard Analyzes Willapa Bay

Tuesday, January 07, 2003
The U.S. Coast Guard is conducting a Waterways Analysis and Management System (WAMS) study of Willapa Bay. Comments related to the study should be submitted by March 1, 2003. Willapa Bay is on the Pacific Coast, just north of the mouth of the Columbia River. The purpose of the WAMS is to validate the adequacy of the existing aids to navigation (ATON) system. WAMS focuses on the waterway’s present ATON system, marine casualty information, port/harbor resources, changes in marine vessel usage (both recreational and commercial), and future development projects.

All comments are welcome until March 1, 2003. To participate in a user survey, please contact: Commander United States Coast Guard 13th Dist.(oan) 915 Second Ave. Seattle, WA 98174-1067 Attn: LTJG Janie Munch


Navy

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