Experts Mull Risks Of Mid-Sea Gasoline Transfer

Tuesday, January 09, 2001
Salvage workers and shipping experts were studying a possible mid-sea transfer of nearly 30,000 tons of gasoline from a damaged tanker at risk of exploding, the ship's operators said. Spanish authorities insisted the tanker would not be allowed back into the country's waters to carry out the potentially risky operation. A tugboat carrying equipment and specialists for the operation had joined the Greek-owned tanker Castor, around 56 km (35 miles) off the Spanish port of Cartagena in the Mediterranean Sea, the ship's operator Athenian Sea Carriers said in a statement. The 1977-built Castor sought refuge in ports in Morocco, Gibraltar and Spain last week after developing a large crack in its main deck but was refused entry amid fears sparks could set off an explosion. The Polish crew abandoned ship on Friday and the tanker was hauled away from Spain by the world's biggest tugboat, the Nikolay Chiker. "Further discussions are now taking place with the salvage team on board with a view to producing a detailed plan which is expected to be submitted to the Spanish maritime authorities by January 9," the Castor's operators said in a statement. However, Spain's Merchant Navy Directorate issued its own statement saying authorities would not allow the boat back into the country's waters and any transfer would have to take place on the high sea. "Spain's maritime authorities will ensure that the boat remains in international waters, far away from the Spanish coast," the Spanish statement said. A spokesman for Athenian Sea Carriers said that could add to the risks of the operation. "It would be much safer to do it closer to the coast, in sheltered waters," he said. The issue of ports providing refuge to damaged tankers is a growing problem in the shipping industry. The tanker Erika sank off western France in 1999 after being refused permission to shelter in the port of Brest, creating one of the world's worst oil spill disasters. The owners of the Castor said any spilt gasoline would evaporate, but hundreds of tons of heavy fuel oil used to propel the vessel could be a bigger problem. - (Reuters)

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter January 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Cruise Ship Trends

World's Richest Travellers Prefer Panama

According to AFP Relaxnews, Panama saw the most growth in interest among the world’s richest jetsetters for travel this winter and spring.   Panama saw the most

SS United States to Sail Again

Crystal Cruises reaches deal to restore the record-breaking and storied SS United States to a fully operational modern luxury cruise ship   Crystal Cruises has

Royal Caribbean Posts 4Q Profit

Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd reported 2015 results and provided guidance for 2016. Continuing on its Double-Double trajectory, the company’s adjusted earnings for 2015 were $4.

Environmental

Sardines Boost Murmansk Port Turnover

In January 2016 turnover of the Murmansk Marine Fishing Port reached 22 thousand tons of cargo, including 15 thousand tons of fish. This is higher than last year,

VPS Raises Concerns Over Revised Rules for Fuels

Veritas Petroleum Services (VPS) expressed reservations about some of the proposed revisions to the international ISO 8217 specifications of marine fuels. Areas

China to Enforce Low Sulphur ECA in Yangtze River Delta

Vessels calling ports in China’s Yangtze River Delta, including Shanghai, will be required to burn low sulphur fuel while at berth from April 1 this year.   China’s

 
 
Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0655 sec (15 req/sec)