Government: News of Ferry Came Late

Wednesday, February 08, 2006
According to the Tribune News Service, Egypt's presidential spokesman said that the owners of the Red Sea ferry that sank last week, causing about 1,000 people to drown, did not inform the government of the disaster for nearly six hours. Suleiman Awad said the government first heard from owner Al Salaam Maritime Transport Co. that the ship was in danger at 7 a.m. Friday. Reports indicate that the Al-Salaam Boccaccio 98 sank no later than 2 a.m. Awad said the rescue center was notified after the government and a plane was over the scene of the sinking by 8 a.m. Source: Tribune news services

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