Hyundai Heavy Leads Shipyard Decline on Prices

Tuesday, January 29, 2008
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., led a decline in South Korean shipyard stocks in Seoul trading on concern prices for new vessels may drop. Hyundai Heavy fell 5.8 percent, the biggest decline in more than a week, to close at 319,500 won in Seoul. Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co., a unit of Hyundai Heavy, fell 7.1 percent to 201,500 won. The shares also dropped after UBS AG said orders may slow this year from the record sales in 2007.

The price for second-hand bulk carriers was as much as 61 percent more than for new vessels last year because of increased demand for iron ore and coal from China and India. Shipyards in South Korea, the world's biggest shipbuilding nation, increased their order backlog last year, even with ship prices at records. The Baltic Dry Index, a benchmark for the price of shipping bulk commodities, has almost halved from an all-time high of 11,039 in November on concerns a U.S. economic recession may lead to a decline in global trade. Hyundai Heavy was the biggest decliner among 50 top companies traded on South Korea's Kospi index.

Shipyards in South Korea, the world's biggest shipbuilding nation, have orderbooks that stretch as far as into 2012. That is prompting shipbuilders to increase production to meet demand. ``The Korean shipbuilding sector could remain volatile in the near term, given weak new order expectations in 2008 from 2007,'' UBS analyst Son Yong Suk wrote in a note dated yesterday. He kept a ``buy'' rating for Hyundai Heavy shares. Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., the world's third-largest shipyard, dropped 1.2 percent to 34,100 won. Samsung Heavy Industries Co., the world's second-biggest, fell 0.5 percent to 28,350 won. STX Shipbuilding Co., the world's No. 5, shed 5.3 percent to 33,300 won. A capesize bulk carrier, the biggest of its type, cost about $97 million in December, 43 percent more than a year earlier, according to London-based Clarkson Plc, the world's biggest shipbroker. The price of a five-year vessel of the same size was 55 percent more expensive. Source: Bloomberg

Maritime Reporter July 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navy

Wrecked 'Russian submarine' found in Swedish waters

A wrecked mini-submarine was found last week in waters off of Sweden’s eastern coast.   Authorities believe it is a Russian model, primarily because of Cyrillic letters on the hull.

Chinese Navy Plays Down S. China Sea Exercises

The Chinese navy played down recent military drills in the South China Sea and criticised other countries for "illegally" occupying islands in the area, the

U.S. 3rd Fleet Shifts Command

Vice Adm. Nora Tyson relieved Vice Adm. Kenny Floyd as commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet during a change of command and retirement ceremony held on Nimitz-class aircraft

Finance

Petronas-led Consortium to Start Construction of B.C. LNG terminal Soon

British Columbia's finance minister Michael de Jong said that the construction of Petroliam Nasional Bhd’s (Petronas) $36 billion liquefied natural gas (LNG) export

SBM Offshore Completes $1.55 bln FPSO Financing

SBM Offshore announced it has today completed the project financing of FPSO Cidade de Saquarema for a total of $1.55 billion, marking the largest project financing in the company's history.

NAT Buys 2 Suexmax Tankers

Nordic American Tankers Limited (NAT) acquires two modern Suezmax tankers, increasing the fleet to 26 vessels    Tanker shipping company NAT announced that it

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2689 sec (4 req/sec)