Hyundai Orders Five MAN B&W Engines

Thursday, December 02, 1999
The largest diesel engine ever designed has been requested by the Korean owner Hyundai Merchant Marine for propelling five 6,400 TEU container vessels. The five engines, which will be constructed and tested in Korea by MAN B&W Diesel licensee Hyundai Heavy Industries, are due for delivery to the yard in late 2000 and early 2001 - the first vessel will be handed over in early 2001. Noted as the most powerful low speed containership engine on the market today, the 12K98MC-C has an output of 7,760-bhp/cylinder, e.g. 93,120-bhp at 104 r/min. for this 12-cylinder version. As a result of this order, 20 additional models of this engine are currently on order or in production.

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