IMO: Proposing Mandatory Traffic Control Compliance

Thursday, October 14, 1999
The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has proposed mandatory compliance by ship masters with orders from shore traffic controllers. The suggestion by IMO Secretary General William O'Neil launched a spirited debate at a conference on navigational safety in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore, hosted by the IMO and Singapore's Institute of Policy Studies. "Under existing regulations, the VTIS (Vessel Traffic Information Systems) has the right to contact the ship concerned and warn of the danger ahead. But the shore authorities have no authority to compel a change of course," he said. "We should ask ourselves if the time has not come to question this approach and to empower the shore authorities, in certain cases, to order ships to take whatever action is necessary to avoid an accident." He said the shipping industry should consider emulating the relationship between airline pilots and air traffic controllers. "There is no doubt that positive traffic control is essential in civil aviation. The principle of control has been accepted in all other modes of transport and there is no reason for not extending it to shipping, when safety would be enhanced," he said. The comments prompted a debate on liability if the captain followed orders from shore. Participants also discussed requiring ships to be fitted with a transponder, or electronic automatic identification system with satellite communication ability that transmits the ship's name, position, speed and course. – (Reuters)

Maritime Today

The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter November 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds


Henriksen Unveils Strongest SOLAS Boat Lifting Hook

H Henriksen of Norway has received SOLAS certification for a new off-load single-point boat lifting hook capable of holding up to 22.5-tonnes. The quick release

Norwegian Escape with Biggest Scrubbers sets Sail

On a sunny October day in the German harbor-town of Hamburg, M/V Norwegian Escape, a brand new cruise ship, sets sail for the first time. On board are five Yara SOx scrubbers – one for each engine.

Controversial Nicaragua Canal Project Postponed

China's Hong Kong Nicaragua Development (HKND) Co. said it is delaying the start of construction on a controversial $50 billion inter-ocean canal across Nicaragua until late 2016.


SSI to Unveil ShipConstructor 2016 R2 at WorkBoat

SSI's latest release, ShipConstructor 2016 R2 will be unveiled for the first time in public at the International WorkBoat Show, December 1-3, in New Orleans.   According to SSI,

Cadmatic Used for Alaska Ferry Design

The Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS) has awarded the Alaska Class Ferry project to Vigor Alaska shipyard in Ketchikan, Alaska, where construction is currently underway.

Hard Problems Demand Soft(ware) Solutions

Make no mistake, the commercial maritime industry will always revolve around heavy duty machinery and mega-machines designed to weather some of the toughest operating conditions on earth.

Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0627 sec (16 req/sec)