INTERTANKO Launches 'Environmental Challenge'

Wednesday, November 13, 2002
In Hong Kong on November 6, INTERTANKO's Environmental Committee Chairman, Doctor Paolo d'Amico, announced the launch of the INTERTANKO Environmental Challenge. Speaking to the delegates at the ITOPF/OCIMF/INTERTANKO seminar, Doctor d'Amico explained that this was aimed at "enhancing shipping's role in environmental protection", stating that 'there was seemingly slow progress in developing a solution for the major marine environmental problems and that the Challenge was the development of a solution to these major environmental concerns facing the tanker world." A number of major issues and concerns that continue to face the tanker industry, and which are high on the agenda of national governments, environmental organisations, the public at large and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), have been identified by the INTERTANKO Environmental Committee. The aim is to promote and then reward through extensive worldwide publicity, cost-effective, practical solutions to the identified issues and concerns that represent significant breakthroughs. On the matter of harmful aquatic organisms in ballast water INTERTANKO is seeking the development of a reliable, cost effective, safe and environmentally sound method for preventing the transfer of these organisms around the globe by ships. INTERTANKO's second Challenge aims for a simple and reliable method for identifying the source of illegal oil discharges from all types of ship, prevention of accidental spills of oil and hazardous materials, and the reduction of outflow after accidents. For air emissions from ships, INTERTANKO is seeking operational solutions, which will provide the shipping industry with the vital tools to meet the growing demand for lower emissions with a continued demand for trade. Doctor d'Amico explained further that 'the solutions are invited from individuals, companies and academic institutions, and might include technological developments, improved procedures or new facilities - the ultimate goal being to benefit both the marine environmental and the tanker industry.'
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