Invest in Seafaring, don’t Criminalize it, warns ISMA President

Monday, April 11, 2005
EUROPE should look to institute laws that reward those choosing the sea as a career instead of singling out seafarers as scapegoats in pollution initiatives, the President of the International Ship Managers’ Association (ISMA) has warned.

Invited to Brussels earlier this week [Tuesday April 5th] to address a high level delegation from the Directorate General for Energy and Transport which included Fotis Karamitsos, Director for Maritime Transport and Jacques Michaux, Deputy Head, Rajaish Bajpaee said that in the face of shortages of quality seafarers, the responsibilities of a seafaring profession can best be met by induction of the best youth into seafaring from grass root levels.

“Scapegoating of seafarers for pollution incidents is turning the youth away and disenchanting existing seafarers with the prestige of their profession. Investment in training on sanctity and custodianship of the oceans and awareness of seafaring as a unique service to humanity promises a far greater preservation of the oceans than legislation on criminalizing the entire profession,” he stressed.

While acknowledging that self-regulation is the only way to achieve sustainable high quality in shipping, Mr Bajpaee suggested that where political regulation could be of value is in a reward-based scheme for direct entry to sea careers.

He stressed: “Ship managers and owners provide a significant alternative to institutional capacities for induction of youth into seafaring careers. These initiatives are not yet regulated. The result is that one half of employers invest into training while the other half poach away the output.

“The vast scope of direct entry routes could be fully realised by regulating cadetship programs, allocating quotas in proportion to total manpower employed on owned or managed fleets, and by rewarding the initiatives in an appropriate manner,” he said.

Maritime Reporter November 2013 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Contracts

Wärtsilä, Diesel United Renew Pact

Wärtsilä and Diesel United Ltd in Japan have signed a ten-year renewal of their co-operation agreement for the sale, manufacturing and servicing of Wärtsilä low-speed marine engines.

Delta "T" Hooks for Offshore Customer

Gaining further ground into the offshore crane market, Delta "T" Systems supplied Cranston Eagle hooks to crane manufacturer Appleton Marine, Inc.   These cranes

China to Import 335 MT of Naphtha, Wants More

China is set to import more than 335,000 tonnes of naphtha and diesel, rare moves for the world's no. 2 oil consumer given it has been self-sufficient at meeting domestic oil product demand,

Legal

Italy Ending Med Sea Rescues

Rights groups warn of risk of more deaths; EU mission Triton will have more limited scope. Italy said on Friday it would close a sea rescue mission that has saved the lives of more than 100,

St. Lawrence Seaway Workers Extend Strike Deadline

The union that represents workers on the St. Lawrence Seaway, the waterway that links the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean, has extended a strike deadline to Monday at 5 p.

Total CEO: EU Must Fight US Crude Export Law

First major public appearance of new Total head; he challenges European politicians to fight US ban. The new head of French energy major Total challenged Europe to fight Washington over the U.

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1126 sec (9 req/sec)